How the U.S. F-15s intercepted Russian Bear bombers in the GIUK Gap: tensions and hilarious moments above Iceland

Aug 04 2014 - 5 Comments

The tight gap between Greenland Iceland and the UK (“GIUK Gap”) was once the main “highway” used by Soviet bombers and maritime reconnaissance aircraft flying to Cuba, monitoring NATO maritime activities or simply probing local air defenses.

The mission to intercept the Soviet Tu-95/Tu-142 was assigned to the 57th FIS (Fighter Interceptor Squadron) “Black Knights”, ldeployed to Keflavik air base, in Iceland, since November 1954. The 57th FIS flew several types of aircraft such as the F-102, the F-106 and the F-4E, before receiving the F-15C/Ds  in November 1985.

The Eagles belonging to the 57th FIS were fitted with CFTs (Conformal Fuel Tanks) which boosted their range allowing the F-15s to intercept and shadow the Bears much further out and for longer time.

A former Black Knights pilot, Lt. Col. Tim “Sweet Lou” Kline described to Steve Davies for his book F-15 Eagle Engaged how an intercept against the Bears took place:

“They were long intercepts. […] we’d be sitting there waiting, looking down at the water-the icebergs in the cold water-and getting our gas from the tanker while we waited, hoping our refueling equipment worked because we were away from Keflavik. Sometimes we could be out there six hours.”

Thanks to the standard CFTs, the F-15 demonstrated to be the perfect aircraft to intercept the Bears in the GIUK Gap.

“When they did show up, they’d still at altitude. Oftentimes we would simply go ‘pure pursuit’ on the raw return because to obtain a lock on would not only give away our presence but also allow the ‘Bear’s’ EWO (Electronic Warfare Operator) to begin tuning in his EW gear and start ‘dueling electrons’ with the APG-63 (the F-15 doppler radar). It was important to not let them know what range we could actually get a lock on at and other information that would prove valuable intelligence to them,” Kline explained.

If the aircraft were Soviet Navy maritime reconnaissance aircraft, instead of flying at cruising level “they’d ramp down to about 300-500ft altitude and slow down to about 230 knots to start dropping the sonobuoys and we would ‘call the drops’ so AWACS could plot their locations for Intel. When they were done they would turn around and go back northeast to Russia.”

Sometimes, during bad weather interceptions, the Soviets turned into the F-15 trying force the fully loaded and bit less responsive Eagle into a dangerous attitude.

Interestingly, at the apex of the Cold War tension, the 57th FIS mechanics fabricated a fictitious EW (Electronic Warfare) pod from a normal baggage pod. To make it more realistic, the fake pod was fitted with various unused UHF, automobile and other types of antennas and was mounted beneath one of the underwing pylons of one of the local F-15s. When the Eagle carrying the faux EW pod intercepted the Bear, the pilot rolled out alongside the Soviet aircraft with the pod fully visible to the Russian aircrew which took a lot of pictures of the previously unseen pod: how much time that Soviet intelligence officer had to waste in trying to identify the new “EW pod” remains a mystery.

Another hilarious moment dates back to the time when one F-15 pilot showed off a Playboy nude centerfold across the expansive side of the Eagle’s canopy, for the Soviet aviators entertainment. Once they saw it, they responded by running the Bear air to air refueling probe (which was encased in a long cylindrical tube extending above the nose and would be run out to clog up into the drogue basket) in and out, and in and out of its protective sleeve.

The Black Knights did not survive too long after the end of the Cold War: in fact the F-15s of the 57th FIS ensured the QRA service at Keflavik until Mar. 1, 1995 when they were eventually disbanded.

Image credit: U.S. Air Force via 318fis.com

 

  • Miguel Vargas-Caba

    Myself, together with Chris Martini, an Italian-American producer friend of mine, we’ll be producing “PROJECT BEAR and EAGLE”, a documentary based on the first-ever meeting of former Soviet and American pilots of the Cold War. On the Soviet side, the pilots flew Tupolev TU-95RTs (NATO: Bear D) out of the USSR and Cuba. On the American side, the pilots flew F-4 Phantoms and F-14 Tomcats out of US Navy aircraft carriers, some others flew out of Keflavík, Iceland. If you’d like to obtain more information about this history-making documentary, I invite you to visit our website and watch the video trailer we prepared, giving you a taste of the film that will be coming soon. In the website you’ll also find information on how you can help us make this historical documentary a reality when contributing your tax-deductible funds (Project Bear and Eagle is a sponsored project of Fractured Atlas, a non‐profit arts service organization).

    https://www.facebook.com/projectbearandeagle/photos/pb.1413217308960032.-2207520000.1407111845./1413219872293109/?type=1&theater

    Website:
    http://www.triplemartiniproductions.com/projectbearandeagle/

    See it also on Facebook:
    https://www.facebook.com/projectbearandeagle?ref_type=bookmark

    • BernardP

      The link to the trailer is a few clicks away from the Facebook page:

  • Paul Negri

    The F-102 was replaced by the F-4C and not the F-106

    • Dave Swagler

      Technically, you are right. But Darts did fly with the unit during the transition to the slatted E-model F-4.

  • Roland Lawrence

    Now thats made me chuckle early on a monday morning reading about certain centrefold exploits. Nice to you can have a sense of humour even in the middle of the cold war. Anyone know what the range of the F15 with CFT’s is?