Category Archives: Aviation Safety / Air Crashes

An Mi-8 gunship helicopter lands on a highway in Kazakhstan to ask for directions

A Soviet-era helicopter landed on a highway and blocked a truck convoy…to ask for directions to the closest village.

An Mi-8 helicopter makes a surprise landing on a highway and blocking a truck convoy somewhere in Kazakhstan. A crew member gets out of the gunship and runs towards the first truck.

He shakes the hand of the driver, and then starts pointing his arms animatedly in different directions, before returning to his place aboard the aircraft. Shortly thereafter, the helicopter takes off again, continuing its mission as if nothing had happened.

This is not a hilarious story but was shown by the video below that spread through the social media.

According to the Kazakhstan Ministry of Defense the helicopter (carrying four rocket pods) was involved in a “planned visual orienteering exercise,” in which trainee pilots were told to determine their location “including by means of human survey.” According to the statement, cited by the local media, the exercise was a “success.”

In other words, the crew member was asking for directions to the closest city after getting lost in poor weather.

“The helicopter has now returned to the airfield where it is based,” the statement concludes according to RT.

This is not the first time helicopters got lost in bad weather and were forced to land before continuing their mission.

On Sept. 10, 2014, six U.S. Army choppers (consisting of Chinook and Black Hawk utility helicopters) landed in the middle of a rapeseed field in Poland in foggy weather. The American pilots received information leaflets on the municipality, in English, and departed again to their destination about 2 hours later, after the weather improved.

Swiss International Air Lines Boeing 777-300 Diverts to Remote Iqaluit Airport Near Arctic Circle

Swiss Boeing 777-300 Bound for L.A. from Zurich Makes Arctic Emergency Landing of Snowy Runway

On Feb. 1, Swiss Airlines Boeing 777-300 operating as flight LX40 from Zurich, Switzerland, to Los Angeles, California, diverted to Iqaluit, Canada, capital of Nunavut in the Canadian Northern Territories.

The diversion was caused by an engine problem that required the shut down of the engine and an emergency diversion: actually, according to a statement later released by Swiss, a malfuction message caused the engine to automatically shutdown. The crew decided to make a precautionary landing.S

The selection of Iqaluit Airport (airport code: YFB) is remarkable since official sources state that Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) officers at this airport have only small general aviation aircraft capacity with for more than 15 passengers.

The large Boeing 777-300 can carry up to 550 passengers in its dense-capacity interior configuration.

Flightradar24.com screengrab showing the track of LX40.

Video posted to YouTube show the large ETOPs (Extended Twin Operations) aircraft making a normal-looking approach and landing on a snowy runway. Additional video shows the aircraft being pushed-back with a ground tug once at the snowy airport.

Editor of TACAIRNET.com, Ian D’Costa, provided this report to The Aviationist.com. Video credit on YouTube is from @Tattuinee on Twitter.

D’Costa, a veteran aviation reporter and airport operations officer told The Aviationist.com, “[It is] unprecedented to say the least. A 777 has an ETOPS rating that would allow it to divert to Toronto, Montreal or Ottawa, or even Gander. So something must have been very concerning.”

U.S. MV-22 Osprey tilt-rotor aircraft crash lands in Yemen during Special OPS raid on Al Qaeda

A U.S. Marine Corps Osprey that was supporting the first known counterterrorism operation under President Trump crash-landed in Yemen. It was later destroyed by U.S. raid.

Early in the morning on Jan. 29, one American Special Operations commando was killed and three others were injured in a fierce firefight with Al Qaeda fighters targeted by a predawn raid against the AQ headquarters in Yemen.

The surprise attack was carried out by commandos from the U.S. Navy SEAL Team 6 in Bayda Province who killed 14 Qaeda militants in what is the first confirmed anti-terror operation under Trump presidency.

It’s not clear what aircraft were supporting the raid; what has been confirmed is that a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22 Osprey aircraft called in to evacuate the wounded American soldiers crash landed, injuring 2 service members (1 according to other sources).

The tilt-rotor aircraft was intentionally destroyed in place by a U.S. raid once it was determined that it could not leave the crash landing site.

This was not the first time a U.S. helo supporting a Special Operation crash lands.

On May 2, 2011, one of the helicopters used by the U.S. Navy SEAL Team 6 in the raid that killed Osama Bin Laden crash landed near OBL’s compound at Abbottabad, Pakistan.

Military on board the helicopter escaped safely on another chopped while the downed one was destroyed leaving only few parts near the Bin Laden’s compound.

Unfortunately for them, those parts didn’t seem to belong to any known type.

In particular, the tail rotor had an unusual cover that could be anything from an armor plate to a noise reduction cover sheltering the motion-control technology used to input low-frequency variations of rotor blade pitch-angle, as tested by NASA; the blades were flatter, and not wing-shaped, whereas the paint job was extremely similar to the kind of anti-radar paint and Radar-Absorbing Material coating used by the most modern stealth fighters: nothing common to either Black Hawks, Chinooks or Apaches helicopters: that crash landed unveiled a Stealth Black Hawk (or MH-X).

Back to the Sunday raid, it’s worth noticing it was the first carried out with commandos, considered that the U.S. has typically relied on drone strikes to target AQ militants in the region (the latest of those were launched each day from Jan. 20 to 22 killing five terrorists). However, it seems this time U.S. troops seized militants laptops, smartphones and other material that was worth the rare ground assault against Al Qaeda.

Top image: file photo of a U.S. Marine Corps MV-22s during an exercise at Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, California (USMC)

 

Boeing 747 freighter crashes in Kyrgyzstan. Flight crew of 4 and 33 civilians on ground killed.

Boeing 747-400 freighter crashed while attempting to land at Kyrgyzstan’s main airport in thick fog.

News media and intelligence reports indicate that MyCargo Airlines Boeing 747-412F registration “TC-MCL”, a freighter operating for Turkish Airlines as TK6491, crashed after a failed go-around attempt on final approach to Manas International Airport in the city of Bishkek, the capital city of Kyrgyz Republic.

The flight crew of four did not survive and reports indicate that 33 civilians living in the village of Dacha-Suu, approximately 2 kilometers (1.2 mi) west of Manas Airport were killed on the ground as a result of the crash.

Video from the scene shows small sections of the aircraft fuselage, larger portions of the nose and parts of the rudder and elevators protruding from destroyed buildings in Dacha-Suu.

B747 cockpit section (credit: EPA)

While official investigations of the cause have not yet concluded as of this early hour following the crash, U.S. news outlet CNN published, “Crew error appears to have caused the deadly crash of the Turkish cargo plane that barreled into a Kyrgyzstan village on Monday, a top Kyrgyz official told state-run news.”

CNN reported that “Kyrgyz Deputy Prime Minister Muhammetkaly Abulgaziev drew the conclusion that ‘crew error’ had led to the crash citing preliminary information, Kyrgyzstan’s [as reported by] state-run news agency Kabar.

A conflicting official airline press release reports, “There is no clear and confirmed information about the reasons for the incident yet.”

The crash occurred at 07:31 local zone time when most residents of the village were still in their homes. Weather in the area included dense early morning fog.

What remains of the tail of the B747-412F (credit: Reuters)

The cargo flight was crewed by four flight crew and was sub-chartered to ACT Airlines by Turkish Cargo. It originated in Hong Kong and was scheduled to land later today in Istanbul, Turkey.

The flight crew onboard Turkish Airlines Flight 6491 was reported by the airline in an official statement as Captain, Lead Pilot Ibrahim Gürcan Diranci; the flight’s Co-Pilot was Kazim Önüdl. Cargo loadmaster onboard was Melih Aslan. The final crewmember on board is reported as Flight Technician Ihsan Koca.

The aircraft had a payload of 85,618 kg (188,755 lbs or 94.3 tons) as reported by the airline. The aircraft’s manufacturer, Boeing, reports maximum payload capacities as between 112,990-124,330 kg (249,100-274,100 pounds or 124.5 -137.0 tons).

Top image credit: Wiki

 

Thai Gripen jet crashes during airshow in Thailand

A Royal Thai Air Force JAS-39 Gripen has crashed in Thailand. Pilot dead.

On Jan. 14, at 09.27 LT, a RTAF JAS-39 Gripen crashed at Hat Yai Airport, Thailand, during an airshow for Thailand’s national Children’s Day.

The 35-year-old pilot who was flying the Swedish-made jet did not eject and died in the incident.

Footage of the accident shows the Gripen starting a slow aileron roll; once inverted, the aircraft fails to complete the maneuver, stops rolling and takes a nosedive crashing near the airfield’s runway.

Thailand purchased 12 JAS-39C/D Gripen multirole jets in 2008, at a cost of about 70M USD apiece.

Salva