Category Archives: China

Selfie of Chinese Pilot as his J-15 naval fighter plane launches from China’s aircraft carrier

J-15 selfie carrier takeoff

It looks like Chinese pilots like self-portrait photos as their “Western” colleagues

We have already published an interesting “selfie” (as self-potrait shots are dubbed) taken by a PLANAF (People Liberation Army Naval Air Force) Shenyang J-15 “Flying Shark” pilot.

It’s not clear whether the following image was taken during the same flight. Nevertheless it is quite cool as it was taken during the departure of the jet from the angled flight deck of Liaoning, the China’s first (Soviet-era, refurbished) aircraft carrier.

The J-15 is a domestic variant of the Russian-designed Sukhoi Su-33, the carrier-based derivative of the Su-27 Flanker.

Image credit: PLANAF via Alert5.com

 

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Third Prototype of China’s Stealth Jet Makes Maiden Flight and Shows Improvements

J-20 2001-11 composite highlights

Chengdu J-20 Stealth Fighter Jet “2011″ has eventually made its maiden flight. A composite image shows how different third prototype is from the the first one.

The third prototype of China’s 5th generation fighter jet made its maiden flight on Mar. 1.

As already explained, Beijing’s radar-evading plane shows several differences from the first (and second) prototype aircraft, a sign China is improving and developing more in the field of low observability applied to fighter jets.

These are, an overall light grey color scheme similar to that of U.S. stealth planes (most probably a radar-absorbing coating); new air intakes; completely redesigned nose section and radome (once again showing resemblance with F-22/F-35); dielectric panels in the front fuselage below the completely redesigned canopy; EOTS (Electro-Optical Targeting System); differently shaped gear bays and slightly different tail fins tips.

Use the top image to check on the one below (click for a higher resolution image) some of the differences between J-20 “2001″ (first prototype) and J-20 “2011″.

J-20 2001-11 composite

Composite image created with images from Xinhua News Agency, Chinese Internet (cjdby.net).

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Upgraded, third prototype of China’s stealth jet ready for maiden flight

J-20 third prototype side

J-20 Mighty Dragon “2011″ has already completed hi-speed taxi tests.

In the last few days, the extremely active Chinese aircraft enthusiasts have documented the ground activity of the third prototype of the J-20 “Mighty Dragon” stealth fighter jet.

The new pictures show the J-20 coded “2011″ performing taxi tests at Chengdu airfield. Following a high-speed taxi, the aircraft raised the nose and then deployed the drag chute to reduce speed: the usual steps that precede the first take off.

What is really interesting about the new plane is that it seems to embed a series of improvements. According to several reports it has a new air intake design, shorter engine nozzles and a (basic?) sensor fusion technology.

J-20 third prototype

For sure the J-20 has something worth a mention: a revised nose section, much similar to that of the much criticised F-35, with an IRST/EOTS (Infra Red Search and Track / Electro Optical Tracking System) – used to hunt low observable aircraft, and a metal finish that loosely reminds the radar absorbing Haze Paint first used on F-16s.

Image credit: Chinese Internet, cjdby.net, fyjs.cn

 

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Australian surveillance plane scrambled to monitor Chinese naval activity

Royal_Australian_Air_Force_Lockheed_AP-3C_Orion_Zhu-1

Royal Australian Air Force Orion aircraft launched to monitor Chinese military exercise that took Beijing’s warships closer to Australia than ever before.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, an unannounced military exercise held in the waters to the north of the Red Continent, brought three Chinese vessels so close to the coastline, to force the Royal Australian Air Force to scramble an AP-3C from RAAF Base Edinburgh, near Adelaide, to observe the warships activities.

The Chinese vessels, two destroyers and a landing ship, came through the Sunda Strait, skirted the southern part of Java, sailed close to Christmas Island before turning northbound through the Lombok Strait near Bali.

Obviously, since it remained in international waters, the Chinese flotilla did nothing really aggressive, even if the trip near Australia proves once again China wants to send the rest the world the message that People’s Liberation Army Navy can operate in both the Indican Ocean and the Pacific and counter the U.S. and Indian maritime powers in the Asia-Pacific region.

The U.S. has recently started deploying strategic bombers to Darwin, in the North of Australia: a B-52 deployed to Guam for a rotational bomber presence in the Pacific has landed there at the end of January to take part in a short term bilateral training with the RAAF.

Image credit: Wiki

 

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Chinese Navy J-15 fighter pilot’s “selfie” taken over Liaoning aircraft carrier

J-15 551 + PL-8 + PL-12 bvraam Chinese J-15 Fighter Jet YJ-83 C803 ANTISHIP MISSILE  CV16 Liaoning Aircraft Carrier People's Liberation Army Navy (PLA Navy) j-15

A rare image taken from inside the cockpit of a J-15 fighter jet.

Not only Western fighter jocks love self-portrait shots (known as “selfies“).

This image shows a pilot of the People’s Liberation Army Naval Air Force (PLANAF) aboard a J-15 “Flying Shark”. The J-15 naval fighter aircraft is the primary plane of China’s new Liaoning aircraft carrier.

You can spot the aircraft carrier on the right hand side: the naval aviator took the photo as he was overflying the Chinese Navy’s flagship.

Image credit: PLANAF via Chinese Military Review

 

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