Cool photos show A-10 Warthogs refueling mid-air during Operation Inherent Resolve

Two U.S. Air Force A-10 Warthogs, assigned to the 163rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, release flares after receiving fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker, 340th Expeditionary Aerial Refueling Squadron, over Southwest Asia, Oct. 13, 2015. Coalition forces fly daily missions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Queen/Released)

These cool photos prove that, given to its privileged observation position, the “boomer” job is one of the most interesting in the Air Force.

Taken on Oct. 13, from a KC-135 Stratotanker belonging to 340th Expeditionary Aerial Refueling Squadron, these gorgeous pictures show two A-10 Thunderbolt II (or “Warthogs”) receiving fuel over Southwest Asia on Oct. 13.

Assigned to the 163rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, these A-10s performs daily missions in support of coalition ground forces involved in Operation Inherent Resolve.

A pair U.S. Air Force A-10 Warthogs, assigned to the 163rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, wait to receive fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker, 340th Expeditionary Aerial Refueling Squadron, over Southwest Asia, Oct. 13, 2015. Coalition forces fly daily missions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Queen/Released)
A pair U.S. Air Force A-10 Warthogs, assigned to the 163rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, wait to receive fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker, 340th Expeditionary Aerial Refueling Squadron, over Southwest Asia, Oct. 13, 2015. Coalition forces fly daily missions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Queen/Released)

Even if it may be close to retirement in fact, the “Hog” remains not only one of the most badass aircraft around, but also one of the weapons of choice for Close Air Support and Battlefield Air Interdiction missions against the Islamic State.

A U.S. Air Force A-10 Warthog, assigned to the 163rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker, 340th Expeditionary Aerial Refueling Squadron, over Southwest Asia, Oct. 13, 2015. Coalition forces fly daily missions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Queen/Released)
A U.S. Air Force A-10 Warthog, assigned to the 163rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, receives fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker, 340th Expeditionary Aerial Refueling Squadron, over Southwest Asia, Oct. 13, 2015. Coalition forces fly daily missions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Queen/Released)

The U.S. Air Force deployed 12 A-10C from Moody Air Force Base, Georgia to Incirlik Air Base, Turkey in support of Operation Inherent Resolve on Oct. 15, 2015. The deployment follows Turkey’s decision to open its bases to U.S. and other Coalition members participating in air operations against ISIL.

A U.S. Air Force A-10 Warthog, assigned to the 163rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, disconnects after receiving fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker, 340th Expeditionary Aerial Refueling Squadron, over Southwest Asia, Oct. 13, 2015. Coalition forces fly daily missions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Queen/Released)
A U.S. Air Force A-10 Warthog, assigned to the 163rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron, disconnects after receiving fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker, 340th Expeditionary Aerial Refueling Squadron, over Southwest Asia, Oct. 13, 2015. Coalition forces fly daily missions in support of Operation Inherent Resolve. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Taylor Queen/Released)

2 Comments

  1. The gun seems most useful in the anti-terror war.. are they able to use it or must they stay above 15000 feet due to MANPADS?

  2. Too bad they are hitting nothing but sand or Syrian government infrastructure. The Russians are killing ISIS. The US created ISIS lock,stock and barrel and these guys are bombing nothin particular although they do kill a lot of Syrian civilians.

Comments are closed.