Take a look at these fantastic air-to-air photographs of the F-35 during its first transatlantic crossing

Cool photographs of a historic achievement.

On Feb. 5, the an F-35A landed at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland, marking the successful ending of JSF’s first ever transatlantic flight.

It was pretty much an Aeronautica Militare (Italian Air Force) achievement: the aircraft was the ItAF’s first F-35, the first JSF built outside the U.S., piloted by one of the two ItAF test pilots, belonging to the Reparto Sperimentale Volo (Test Wing) from Pratica di Mare, who successfully completed the training at Luke AFB in November last year, and supported by a formation made by 2x KC-767s, 2x C-130Js and 2x Typhoons, all belonging to the Italian Air Force.

F-35 crossing 2

11 flying hours, one stopover (in Lajes, Portugal) and 7 aerial refuelings made the crossing possible.

F-35 crossing 3

In this post you can find some cool photographs of the trip just released by the Italian Ministry of Defense. Noteworthy, the image below (the only one on the ground) shows the pilot performing the external checks on the F-35: you can clearly see the low-visibility 13th Gruppo (Squadron) emblem applied to the left air intake.

F-35 crossing checks

Image credit: Italy MoD

About David Cenciotti 4450 Articles
David Cenciotti is a freelance journalist based in Rome, Italy. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviationist”, one of the world’s most famous and read military aviation blogs. Since 1996, he has written for major worldwide magazines, including Air Forces Monthly, Combat Aircraft, and many others, covering aviation, defense, war, industry, intelligence, crime and cyberwar. He has reported from the U.S., Europe, Australia and Syria, and flown several combat planes with different air forces. He is a former 2nd Lt. of the Italian Air Force, a private pilot and a graduate in Computer Engineering. He has written four books.

7 Comments

    • Exactly: 75% more range, world second more powerful radar fitted on a fighter after f22’aesa.

  1. The flight was about 7000 km, this means that every 1000 km you will need a refuel, this means that approximately 500 km of range?

    • By eurofighter’s pilots at langley in 2006 : host centre did not deny any tracking but simply said that f22 used for exercises had “augmented ” rcs for safety issues, without beeing more precise…You are interested in fighter issues and you did not know the most debated real exercise between the 2 most powerful air dominance planes?

  2. Yeah, and the Typhoon need even more. It must REALLY suck right? (Good god, somebody educate this troll on the concept of “divert fields”. )

Comments are closed.