Cessna’s Low Cost Scorpion Tactical Jet sports a brand new, cool Color Scheme

Scorpion multirole jet has got a new two-tone grey color scheme.

Cessna parent company Textron has released the first image of its Scorpion combat aircraft in a new two-tone grey color scheme that has eventually replaced the initial overall white livery.

The new “camouflage” gives the multi-role, low cost twin-engine jet a more aggressive appearance.

The Scorpion is an ISR (intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance) platform/light tactical strike aircraft for “irregular warfare,” border and maritime patrol, intelligence surveillance reconnaissance, counter-narcotics and air defense operations.

In the wake of Switzerland’s recent rejection of the Saab Gripen E, the aircraft was pitched as a low-cost alternative to the SAAB combat plane as a replacement for the Swiss Air Force’s ageing F-5 Tiger fighters. Even though the new aircraft is much cheaper than the Gripen and could meet 90% of the tasks (according to Textron), the Scorpion is not equipped with air-to-air radar or missiles making it hard to believe, based on the current specifications, it could be used to fit the Swiss requirements.

Nevertheless, one of the most interesting videos of the aircraft shows the Scorpion intercept a Cessna 182 in a typical SMI (Slow Mover Interception) scenario.

Image credit: Textron (H/T to Isaac Alexander for the heads-up)

 

About David Cenciotti 3727 Articles
David Cenciotti is a freelance journalist based in Rome, Italy. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviationist”, one of the world’s most famous and read military aviation blogs. Since 1996, he has written for major worldwide magazines, including Air Forces Monthly, Combat Aircraft, and many others, covering aviation, defense, war, industry, intelligence, crime and cyberwar. He has reported from the U.S., Europe, Australia and Syria, and flown several combat planes with different air forces. He is a former 2nd Lt. of the Italian Air Force, a private pilot and a graduate in Computer Engineering. He has written four books.