The cool “Splinter” paint scheme was inadvertently invented for U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornets

Sep 13 2013 - 1 Comment

“Splinter” paint schemes have become a distinguishing feature of U.S. Air Force Aggressors and later appeared on Iranian F-14s (under the name of Asian Minor II camouflage).

The “splinter” pattern is used to make the fighter jet to which it is applied similar to a Russian 4th and 5th generation aircraft.

Noteworthy, we have recently received an email from Gregory Slusher, a reader of The Aviationist, who explained in a really interesting email how the color scheme was “inadvertently invented” for U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornets.

“As a young U.S. Marine Sergent, me and my fellow corrosion control techs inadvertently invented the paint design,” Slusher explains.

“The squadron in question is F/A-18 squadron VMFAT-101 out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, California. The unit is a pilot training squadron and as such features quite a bit of air-to-air training. With the standard grey paint scheme, rookie Hornet pilots could not distinguish their targets from “friendlies.” My CO tasked our corrosion shop with creating and aggressive paint scheme that would help to aid the young pilots in target ID. It took us a few attempts, but we settled on a randomly placed collection of geometric shapes.”

So, the “splinter” color scheme was not introduced to make the jets similar to their Russian adversaries, just to make them more visible.

Tail number 26 was our prototype, and is obviously not as angular. We were not completely satisfied. Tail number 34 was when we had really hit upon a formula that we and the command enjoyed. Tail number 12 was a desert variant and our favorite of the jets we painted. Initially we did not paint the radome since they are swapped frequently. Later, the shop gained the approval to paint them.”

Splinter F-18 side

Image credit: Gregory Slusher

If you “google” VMFAT-101, you would see much of their work, as it has been photographed quite extensively at air shows, well before other services decided to apply a similar paint scheme to their planes.

Top image: Capt. John “Tank” Voss, USMC via Gregory Slusher

 

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  • mapanggulo

    Always nice to see that “young U.S. Marine Sergent’s” are still cocky as ever. That Paint Scheme/Design has been around a hell of a lot longer than that young man has been a Marine. Keith Ferris had multiple camouflage designs just as “angular” and looked the same. BTW funny how they said the paint job was not about making the jets similar to their Russian adversaries and yet they carry a big red star and numbers on them.

    I’ll give them props though…the F/A-18’s do pull off the design pretty nicely.