U.S. WC-135 nuclear sniffer airplane has left the UK heading towards Norway and the Barents Sea

Feb 22 2017 - 3 Comments

The WC-135 Constant Phoenix has launched from RAF Mildenhall earlier today for a mission towards northern Europe and the Barents Sea. Interestingly, an RC-135W spyplane has launched from the same base on the same route. What’s their mission?

As you probably already know, on Feb. 17, 2017, U.S. Air Force WC-135C Constant Phoenix Nuclear explosion “sniffer,” serial number 62-3582, deployed to RAF Mildenhall, UK, using radio callsign “Cobra 55.”

Whereas it was not the first time the Constant Phoenix visited the British airbase, the deployment to the UK amidst growing concern about an alleged spike in iodine levels recorded in northern Europe fueled speculations that the WC-135 might be tasked with investigating the reason behind the released Iodine-131.

In fact, along with monitoring nuclear weapons testing, the WC-135 can be used to track radioactive activity, as happened after the Chernobyl nuclear plant disaster in the Soviet Union in 1986 and Fukushima incident back in 2011, by collecting particles and chemical substances in the atmosphere, days, weeks, or sometimes even month after they were dispersed.

Whilst the reason of the deployment has yet to be confirmed (actually, there are still contradictory reports about the spike in Iodine-131) the WC-135 has departed for its first mission since it arrived at Mildenhall: on Feb. 22, at around 11.50LT, the nuclear “sniffer” aircraft has departed for a mission towards Norway and the Barents Sea.

The WC-135C (radio callsign “Flory 58”) was supported by two KC-135 tankers (“Quid 524” and “525”)suggesting it had just started a very long mission and somehow accompanied, along the same route, by an RC-135W (“Pulpy 81”) and another Stratotanker (“Quid 513”).

It’s hard to guess the type of mission this quite unusual “package” has embarked on: investigating the alleged iodine spike? Collecting intelligence on some Russian nuclear activity? Something else?

Hard to say.

For sure, once the aircraft reached Aberdeen, eastern Scotland, they turned off their transponder becoming invisible to the flight tracking websites such as Flightradar24.com or Global.adsbexchange.com that use ADS-B, Mode S and MLAT technologies to monitor flights: a sign they were going operational and didn’t want to be tracked online.

H/T to @CivMilAir for the heads up and details

 

  • leroy

    My guess is a non-catastrophic Russian SSN problem/accident that caused them to surface and vent nuclear material of some sort. After all, their nuke subs are flimsy deathtraps! Would they do the honorable thing and warn people so as to enhance worldwide public health and safety? You bet your life they wouldn’t. It’s obvious they have already endangered millions of people in Europe. Never trust ’em. That’s how you deal with Moscow!

  • Matthew Valentini

    Lot’s of Iodine-131 and nothing else? Guess who is testing their latest Uranium Hydride nukes with low fallout? Hint, they could decimate North America and the blowback wouldn’t even reach them.

  • SeeSure

    My guess is if the CTBTO (the people who measure atmospheric radioactivity) have said there is no increased levels in the last few months, then this is just regular training to keep the crews current. No need to shoehorn this into another Russian beating session leroy, they do enough dodgy stuff we don’t need to invent more.