Are We Seeing B-21 Raider Development and Testing Activity at Area 51?

Nov 28 2017 - 15 Comments
By Tom Demerly

With New Projects in Development, and New Construction, The Area is Ramping Up.

We’re not sure what is happening inside (and close to) the restricted Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), but after visiting the area earlier this month, we are reasonably certain something significant is taking place right now. The massive area, reported to be 4,531 square miles, is one of the most secure national security sites and is closed to the public.

Earlier this month we drove the remote roads along the perimeter of the NTTR between Las Vegas, Nevada and Beatty, Nevada on the way to and from the Jedi Transition low-level flying area in Death Valley National Park. While this is one of the emptiest, most barren stretches of paved highway in the U.S. in just a few hours we made a number of interesting observations.

Sometime after 3:00 AM across from Creech AFB we saw a military-aged male with a beard in civilian clothes and a medium-sized piece of luggage or large lunch box board an airport-style shuttle bus and drive away on Highway 95 west of Creech. The vehicle drove a significant distance west and north on the highway before we lost sight of it. There is almost nothing out there. On the trip back that night we saw an F-117 fuselage covered by a tarp being transported on a flatbed truck in the dark west-bound on Highway 95. Earlier in the day someone had gotten photos of it by the side of the road.

In less than 24 hours, on one stretch of road at the outskirts of a massive 4,000+ mile testing range, we saw that much activity.

Moreover, the following day, on Nov. 14, an authority on the area referred to only as “G” of lazygranch.com, shot photos of an F-117 flying with a two-seat F-16. The very same day, in the afternoon a similar (or maybe the same with a diffirent configuration) two-seat F-16, carrying the Lockheed Martin’s AN/AAS-42, an IRST (Infra Red Search and Track) pod (theoretically capable to detect stealth aircraft by their IR signature), with sparse markings was photographed flying through the Jedi Transition. The photo was good enough that we could identify a patch worn on the right shoulder of each of the aircraft’s flight suits. The patches suggest the crew are associated with the famous “Red Hats” opposing forces test unit and the 53rd TEG Det 3, the unit thought to have replaced the 4477th “Red Eagles”, another opposing force simulation and testing unit.

Separate and additionally from those sightings near or around Tonopah Test Range, journalist Tyler Rogoway at The War Zone, has been a keen observer of the Nevada Test and Training Range. Rogoway reported on the appearance of several new construction projects at Area 51, notably, a new “U” shaped taxiway, vehicle roadway and most interestingly, a large aircraft hangar.

The new, large finished hangar within the square taxiway. (Photo: Ufo Seekers)

If you compare satellite imagery of Area 51 beginning in 1984 you see a progression of small changes followed by the significant addition of a long, second, parallel runway. Work on the second runway began in 1990 and seemed complete in about 1992. From 1999-2000 several new buildings appeared in satellite photos. In 2001-2002 an intermediate vehicle road connecting taxiways and runways was built. And most recently, in 2013, a major new construction project began at the southwest corner of the area. Soon after, in July 2014, the U.S. Air Force issued a request for proposal for a new, long range, low-observable strike aircraft. The project became the LRS-B. From 2014 to 2016 a large, new hangar was built at the southwestern corner of the facility. The structure appears to be nearly large enough to house an aircraft the size of the current B-1B Lancer bomber.

The latest satellite photos show what appears to be new engine test facilities, and most significantly, the southern taxiways and hangar in new-looking condition. Comparing the satellite photos of the facility going back to 1984, the two most significant, visible expansions are the second runway in 1990 and the new southwest square taxiway and hangar building beginning in 2014.

An analysis of satellite images over time reveal the major construction projects at Area 51/Groom Lake since 1984 including the most recent hangar and taxiways. (Photo: GoogleEarth)

The following video takes you on a “sightseeing tour” of Groom Lake from Tikaboo Peak:

Noted aerospace imaging expert Al Clark told TheAviationist.com, “In the general Groom Lake image our best reference is one of the F-16s parked on the west side of the base. The F-16 length is approximately 50-feet. Building number one, which is almost directly west of the F-16s is approximately 120’x120’. It looks to be an engine test/run-up hangar. The building that is more interesting is approximately 250-feet wide by a length of 275-feet. This is interesting because the B-2 wingspan is only 172-feet, so this is [possibly] designed to house large aircraft, in my opinion possibly the B-21 Raider. To the southwest of that structure it looks like what could be a weapons storage facility. The smaller bunker is approximately 75-feet long by 30-feet wide, and the larger bunker is approximately 75-feet wide and 100-feet long. Those are fairly large weapons bunkers. The general placement of the munitions depot tells me that there is something pretty volatile in it because they are keeping it away from the main base at Groom Lake.”

Is what we are seeing evidence of the LRS-B program development and the B-21 Raider? While there are likely several other major developmental programs underway including a new manned or unmanned reconnaissance and strike platform (the RQ-180 spy drone is one of them), LRS-B and B-21 are the most mature and most talked about in official channels and, as a result, most conclusions point to something related to their development out at Area 51 in the new hangar.

Prior to her departure from the office, former Air Force Secretary Deborah James told media, “Our 5th generation global precision attack platform will give our country a networked sensor shooter capability enabling us to hold targets at risk anywhere in the world in a way that our adversaries have never seen.” Her comments about the LRS-B program and B-21 acknowledge both the capability and necessity of the program, and may suggest the urgency of it as the Air Force maintains its small fleet of B-2 Spirit low-observable long range strike aircraft against a growing demand for its unique capability.

That might mean we are seeing the B-21 Raider development program take shape right under our noses at Area 51. Or this is what they want us to believe.

  • leroy

    Lots of RCS test facilities located in Nevada, so I would expect B-21 to be run through them. Here’s a list:

    http://geimint.blogspot.com/2007/08/us-restricted-and-classified-test-sites.html

    And as recently reported in the LA Times (and commented on by yours truly) B-21 production is starting to ramp up:

    A top secret desert assembly plant starts ramping up to build Northrop’s B-21 bomber

    http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-fi-northrop-bomber-20171110-htmlstory.html

    So it would make sense that we’d start to see hangar facilities being built at A51 to accommodate the B-21. I expect we’ll see photos of the actual plane rather soon. What does everyone’s friend Leroy think? Goodie! : )

    • WpnsLoader175

      Very true. I can also say there are alot of EW ranges.

  • CharleyA

    A prototype in the class of the B-21 has been rumored to be flying for several years now. Or perhaps it is a B-21 facility. The USAF did say that a lot of development work had already been done prior to awarding the B-21 contract.

    • Uniform223

      I think they were most likely developing technologies and concepts before the L_RSB. For instance the replacement the NGB that was supposed to replace the B-52 and B-1. I would think that the technologies developed for the NGB has been further refined/developed and will carry over to the L-RSB.

  • Defence Today

    I understand some of the F-117’s are being converted to UAV test platforms, flying out of Creech Air Force Base

  • Uniform223

    Wouldn’t be too far fetched, they did develop the B-2 out there.

    • william kilbourne

      The whale was tested at 51, the B2 was developed in Pico rivera, built in palmdale, and flight tested at Edwards and other facilities

  • Festivusfortherestofus

    Any chance this also could be related to the SR-72?

  • WpnsLoader175

    For a program like that they need a lot of special infrastructure. I don’t know of its related by test range time used but Edwards AFB is disappearing like crazy. Some “other program” has priority.

  • Ilya Kurenkov

    What really impress me in US aerospace industry is its ability to make a first class show from nothing.
    Don’t get me wrong, I really enjoy all these discussions of new hangars and rubber trails (or lack of them) on runways.
    Helps to think tax money are spent in proper way.

  • gariac

    Better photo of the area at
    http://www.lazygranch.com/a51pan.html#New_Construction_2015
    Most people think that is just a scoot and hide, with the B-21 being built at Plant 24. Note that when this building was being build, there was light pouring out of the sides, suggesting venting of some sort.

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    Whatever aircraft this hanger is made for, it’s wide and/or long. Look at the radius of curvature of the taxiways. The landing gear mains are set wide apart. Also, why the in -> out arrangement? They can’t turn it around in the hanger? That points to the idea that it’s long. A flying wing could be pivoted inside and leave on the same taxi way it came in. A long craft that just fits inside cannot. It enters, gets serviced, and exits with its nose always pointing in the same direction. And note the proximity to the runway. We don’t want it to be taxing for long before takeoff …. cryogenic fuels? Superchilled hydrocarbons for densification like Space X does with it’s RP-1? Pure speculation of course, but on landing it has a back taxi at least to enter the hanger. Note that hangers are usually placed near the midpoint of runways. This building is for something special.

    Also: Notice how the taxi ways terminate to the left of the taxiway …. They’re going to build more.

  • Robert Partridge

    Cool. We can use it to give ISIS much needed air support.

  • Andrew Tubbiolo

    No of course not, however this pass thru set up is not something I see a lot of. A large aircraft can easily be backed in and out of a hanger. However there’s no apron to do this in this case. I’m simply speculating on why a pass thru option was built into this hanger.

  • leroy

    At times I’m a commentator, at times an analyst. Never try to box ol’ Leroy in. That said, I accept your olive branch. A warning though – you will probably end up taking it away. : )