Norway’s First Three F-35 Jets Have Just Landed At Orland Air Force Station

The first three 5th Generation stealth aircraft have arrived in Norway.

On Nov. 3, at about 15.57 local time, the first three F-35A jets (AM-8, AM-9 and AM-10) destined to the RNoAF (Royal Norwegian Air Force) and delivered directly to Norway have landed at Ørland Air Force Station, in central Norway.

Norway plans to procure up to 52 F-35A, at an estimated cost of about NOK 70 billion (+7.3B USD), including weapons and support, to replace its fleet of ageing F-16s, that will be replaced in 2021. The first two aircraft were delivered in 2015 followed by another two in 2016 and three more ones earlier in 2017, but these aircraft were based at Luke Air Force Base, Arizona, where they are used for Norwegian and partner country pilot training.

The first three RNoAF F-35s on the ground at Orland Air Force Station, Norway. (RNoAF)

The landing of the three F-35 at their new homebase at Ørland Air Force Station marks the first direct delivery from Lockheed Martin’s Fort Worth facility to Norway, where all the remaining planes will be delivered, at a rate of six new jets per year from 2018 onward.

The arrival will be officially celebrated on Nov. 10, 2017, on the day of the Royal Norwegian Air Force’s 73rd anniversary.

Top image credit: Lockheed Martin

Salva

About David Cenciotti 4451 Articles
David Cenciotti is a freelance journalist based in Rome, Italy. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviationist”, one of the world’s most famous and read military aviation blogs. Since 1996, he has written for major worldwide magazines, including Air Forces Monthly, Combat Aircraft, and many others, covering aviation, defense, war, industry, intelligence, crime and cyberwar. He has reported from the U.S., Europe, Australia and Syria, and flown several combat planes with different air forces. He is a former 2nd Lt. of the Italian Air Force, a private pilot and a graduate in Computer Engineering. He has written four books.

9 Comments

  1. Dont forget about former soviet (Estonia, Latvia, and Poland for example) states that do not want to go back into a “greater” Russia.

    • And who says Russia wants those small countries back? There is nothing to gain for them. Before you write something, think if what you write is plausible or just fear mongering by NATO propagandists. Of course they will tell you Russia is dangerous. It’s the old game to get more money for the military. Nothing else.

      • What did Russia have to gain by steam rolling into Georgia? Same answer, nothing yet they did anyways. Putin wanted to flex military muscle and see what the world would do. For the most part; nothing. Then he did it again in Ukraine. Putin did make comments that he intends to expand and strengthen Russia’s influence both regional and international. In a regional sense what better way then to push around former soviet states.

        • https://www.stratfor.com/weekly/russo_georgian_war_and_balance_power
          There. That’s a neat assessment of the situation from Stratfor.
          Quote: “Georgia’s move was deliberate.”

          This time the shelling was just the beginning. Georgia started moving in with troops.

          Russia responded asymmetrically. But the military equipment the Russians used was what the west would consider 2nd line troops. Still enough for a country like Georgia. It’s similar to the U.S. invasion of Grenada or other small countries. Don’t you think? There was indeed nothing to “gain” in Georgia. Russia just made sure that Georgia’s military was crippled for a longer time to prevent further incursions. And in the end Russia left the country for good.

          What exactly did Russia again in Ukraine? I haven’t seen any reports about regular Russian troops from any western intelligence service. Yet, you keep repeating it.

          Joseph Göbbels: “Wenn man eine große Lüge erzählt und sie oft genug
          wiederholt, dann werden die Leute sie am Ende glauben.”

          Translation: If you tell a big lie and you repeat if often enough then the people will believe it in the end.

          That might have worked in the past, when there was no access to other information. But now we have the internet and whistle blowers. We also have hackers like anonymous, who frequently obtain secret documents and publish them.

          The U.S. is considering Latin America their backyard.
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monroe_Doctrine#Cold_War

          Chile is a good example how the U.S. took part in overthrowing democratically elected governments in that region.

          But when the U.S. meddles with Russia’s backyard, Russia is not allowed to have objections. Typical western double standards.

      • What did Russia have to gain by steam rolling into Georgia? Same answer, nothing yet they did anyways. Putin wanted to flex military muscle and see what the world would do. For the most part; nothing. Then he did it again in Ukraine. Putin did make comments that he intends to expand and strengthen Russia’s influence both regional and international. In a regional sense what better way then to push around former soviet states.

  2. Oh, the Georgia card again.
    It was Mikheil Saakashvili who started the war.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2009/sep/30/georgia-attacks-unjustifiable-eu

    The government of the Ukraine had already agreed in February 2014 to new elections. The coup was enacted nonetheless because that was the only way the west could make sure the desired people came to power. Democratic elections could have had a different, undesired outcome.

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/21/ukraine-agreement-signed-early-election_n_4830727.html
    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-26079957

  3. Objectivity is something that can’t be expected from lery and 2 or 3 more people in his wake.

Comments are closed.