Cockpit video of the Pakistani JF-17 Thunder during air display at Paris Air Show

Interesting video brings you on board a PAC JF-17 during the air display at PAS 2015.

The JF-17 Thunder is a light, single-engine, multi-role combat aircraft jointly manufactured by the Pakistan Aeronautical Complex (PAC) and the Chengdu Aircraft Corporation (CAC) of China.

The Pakistan Air Force plans to operate 160 JF-17 multirole jets about one-third of those are already in active service.

Three JF-17s are currently attending Paris Air Show in an effort to attract more customers: during the Air Show the first export order was confirmed and signed with an undisclosed Asian country (believed to be Myanmar).

Here is footage showing the Pakistan Air Force JF-17 performing aerobatic maneuvers during its display at PAS 2015.

H/T to Giuliano Ranieri for the heads-up

 

About David Cenciotti
David Cenciotti is a journalist based in Rome, Italy. He is the Founder and Editor of “The Aviationist”, one of the world’s most famous and read military aviation blogs. Since 1996, he has written for major worldwide magazines, including Air Forces Monthly, Combat Aircraft, and many others, covering aviation, defense, war, industry, intelligence, crime and cyberwar. He has reported from the U.S., Europe, Australia and Syria, and flown several combat planes with different air forces. He is a former 2nd Lt. of the Italian Air Force, a private pilot and a graduate in Computer Engineering. He has written five books and contributed to many more ones.

5 Comments

  1. I’m assuming that any comparison’s to US or Russian aircraft would be meaningless, because these jets weren’t designed to go head to head with them. This may be a smart move financially for Pakistan, but I’m guessing it will destabilize some areas in the world, including southeast Asia and the middle east. It’s also an attempt at ‘sabre rattling’ towards India.

  2. I saw it in static display and in demo flight, and I must say that the flight was quite impressive.
    In flight, the plane looked like an F16 (which I saw a few times in demo flight too), and actually as manoeuvrable as the Viper or another single engine fighter. Lightweight, rolls fast, however the turbofan was quite smokey.
    This is a classic airframe design, something between the F16 (from above) and a Mirage (profile). Its large apexes and divergent outer missile rails remind the F18E.
    On a personal note, I must admit that I prefered the aerobatics the Pakistani pilot pulled than the Rafale’s (which I know well, since I’m French), it was an exotic touch in this airshow and one of the only two fighter jets in flight, which was really disappointing from everyone’s opinion (even the US pilots I talked to).

    I’m not here to gamble on what this fighter is really capable of in combat, but the nice pamphlet they were giving away (14 pages in colour) was talking price, and it’s worth “a third of its occidental counterparts”. They built this plane and the plant which products it out of barely nothing, which is quite remarquable for a country like Pakistan (even if helped by China), considering. Little is known about its avionics and weapon systems, as well as the capabilities of the weapons it carries, so discussing this could only be speculation VS propaganda.
    In my opinion, this plane, for what it’s worth and what I have seen, is a decent alternative for a low-budget air force which wants a basic 4-gen aircraft, while staying away from European, US, or Russian influence.

    Here are the few pics I took of it, enjoy ;).

  3. ahhh F-35 the dream, that’s not coming true. a plan that’s underground all the time? anytime the ban is lifted and a flight is made, kabooom, something breaks, blasts, doesn’t function. And by the way, this plan is not built to fight with those kind of planes, but please, first at least bring that F-35 to a show or an exercise, but that damn plane just doesn’t wanna fly i guess. and your knowledge(lessness)) of this technology is well elaborated by your comment, so please don’t prove it any further.

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