Tag Archives: Sukhoi Su-25

This Infographic Sums Up All We Know About the Russian Air War in Syria

This Infographic says it all you need to know about Putin air war in Syria.

Prepared by CIGeography‘s Louis Martin-Vézian for the Offiziere.ch, the infographic in this post shows the evolution of Russia’s intervention in Syria: from the military build-up, to the deployment of the Russian Air Force attack planes to Latakia, to the air strikes conducted against terrorist targets across the country.

If you can’t see the infographic below, click here to download it in high-definition.


Many thanks to Louis Martin-Vézian @CIGeography for allowing us to post the infographic on The Aviationist.


Interesting footage brings you aboard Russian Su-30SM jets taking part in missions over Syria

Interesting video shows RuAF Su-30SMs at work.

Little is known, about the four Su-30SM Flanker-derivative jets deployed to Latakia, Syria.

In fact, whilst the rest of the Russian Air Force contingent (Su-34, Su-24 and Su-25 jets) has been under the spotlight since Russia launched its first raids against terrorist targets, the Su-30s have seldom been mentioned in the news updates by the Russian MoD.

Actually, the most interesting news dealing the Su-30s dates back to the beginning of the month when one Flanker violated the Turkish airspace and locked on a TuAF F-16 for more than 5 minutes.

More recently, footage emerged of a Su-30SM flying close to an MQ-9 Reaper drone.

At least there is a video now, published by RT, that provides some details about the Flanker operations in Syria.

The video, which includes some cockpit footage, shows the Su-30s taxiing, taking off and landing at al-Assad airport near Latakia. Interestingly, the aircraft operate in air-to-air configuration only, confirming the reports that the aircraft mainly fly CAPs (Combat Air Patrols), providing some support to the strike packages going after the ground targets disclosed by UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) reconnaissance missions.


Impressive shots of Russian Su-24 and Su-34 jets launching at night from Latakia airbase in Syria

Russian Air Force Su-34s and Su-24s night operations at Latakia airbase.

Released by the Russian MoD, the pictures in this post show Sukhoi Su-24 Fencer and Su-34 Fullback attack planes taking off from Latakia airbase, in western Syria, for night air strikes.

Su-34 night launch 1

Su-34 night launch 2

The visual effect created by the flames of the afterburner makes these shots quite impressive.

Su-24 night launch 1

Su-24 night launch 2

Su-24 night launch 3

According to the latest figures made available by Moscow, the Russians have carried out 934 combat sorties and destroyed 819 terrorists’ facilities since the RuAF contingent has launched the first air strikes in Syria (with results and targets still debated).

Su-25 night

Image credit: Russia’s MoD via Creative Commons

Watch this interesting video of the Russian planes (with Red Star painted over) at work in Syria

Take a look at what happens inside Latakia airbase, where the Russian Air Force contingent is based.

The following exclusive video by RT brings you inside al-Assad International Airport, near Latakia, where Russian Air Force contingent, currently made of 36 combat planes, is based.

The footage is extremely interesting as it clearly shows the six Su-34 Fullback aircraft returning from the first combat sorties against Islamic State targets in Syria.

A closer look at the warplanes provides the confirmation that all the aircraft, including the Su-25s and the Su-34s, were removed the standard Russian Air Force markings and the typical Red Star: most probably the Russians don’t want their symbol to be shown off along with the wreckage of a plane in case one is shot down or crashes in Syria.

By the way, the insignia were overpainted on the Su-30SMs and the Su-24Ms as well, even if these are not clearly visible in this video; however there are screenshots in the social media that prove the same applies to Flankers and Fencers.

Su-34 tail

Su-25 Latakia

This is not the first time aircraft taking part in real operations are stripped off their national markings. UAE F-16s deployed to Jordan to take part in Operation Inherent Resolve didn’t wear the national flag while some U.S. drones deployed in sensitive areas perform their clandestine missions “unmarked.”

Here’s an interactive map of all the Russian airstrikes in Syria

The Russian contingent has launched its airstrikes in Syria. And this interactive map shows them all.

On Sept. 30, the Russian Air Force launched its first airstrikes in Syria (with controversial results).

Since then, the RuAF contingent has launched more raids, some of those conducted by the six Su-34 Fullback bombers, the most advanced tactical jets in the Russian inventory, deployed to Latakia just a couple of days before they were used for the first time in combat.

The following interactive map by @Radicalenzyme shows the location of all the known attacks so far.

As the RuAF Su-24s, Su-25s and Su-34s deliver their unguided and guided munitions on ISIS (and, according to some reports, Free Syrian Army) targets there is some concern that the lack of coordination with the US-led coalition may cause some trouble sooner or later.

Considered the number of sorties launched by the coalition (from 1 to 6, according to the daily reports by U.S. CENTCOM) the risk of mid-air between Russians and U.S. planes is still quite low. Beginning on Oct. 2, Su-30SMs have appeared next to the attacking Russian planes: they are equipped with good air-to-air radars, useful to have an idea of the “picture.”

According one of our sources with deep knowledge of Operation Inherent Resolve, who wishes to remain anonymous “with a growing presence of Sukhois across Syria and little notification, we can’t completely rule out that different packages will one day come a bit too close each other. Can you imagine what happens the first time an escort plane supporting a strike package starts tracking a Russian plane, or vice versa? The best solution is to divide the Syrian airspace into different areas and assign them to the different parties.”