Tag Archives: Italian Air Force

We have taken part in a mission aboard a HH-139A multipurpose combat helicopter

…and here some stunning photos of the Italian Air Force HH-139A helicopter as you have never seen it before.

The HH-139A is the military variant of the AgustaWestland AW139 helicopter operating with the Italian Air Force.

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It is a multipurpose chopper equipped with lot of modern equipment, including an integrated NVG-compatible glass cockpit, 4-axis digital Digital AFCS (automatic flight control system) with SAR modes & FMS SAR patterns, weather/search radar, TCAS (Traffic Collision Avoidance System) II, FLIR (Forward Looking Infra-Red), Health and Usage Monitoring System (HUMS), Digital video recorder, Video downlink, Moving map on flat display, Auto-Deployable ELT (ADELT) and Enhanced Ground Proximity Warning System (EGPWS).

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The HH-139A also features a secure communications suite, integrated defensive aids suite, hoist, search light, wire cutters, nose mounted FLIR, cargo hook, loudspeaker system and emergency floatation gear and any other equipment required to perform “convetional” search and rescue, as well as Combat SAR missions.

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However, it can also do something more.

Along with provisions for two wing-mounted pods for 70 mm unguided rockets the helicopter can be carry a bambi bucket for aerial firefighting activity.

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The Aviationist’s contributor Alessandro Caglieri had the opportunity to take part in a training flight aboard an Italian Air Force HH-139A belonging to the 15° Stormo (Wing) temporarily deployed to Decimomannu airbase, Sardinia, along with another helicopter of the same type in order to perform SAR duties in place of the local-based AB.212 chopper, grounded by maintenance works.

In this post you can see the stunning pictures he took during the firefighting training mission that provide an interesting insight into the cockpit, instruments and equipment of the HH-139A.

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During the deployment (from Apr. 28 to May 28, 2015), the HH-139As totaled about 50 flight hours during those four crews were qualified on the helicopter in the firefighting role.

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Newsworthy, on May 14, the type was involved in its first ever firefighting mission, when a HH-139A involved in a training flight was diverted to fire a wild-fire in the town of Escalaplano, not far from Cagliari.

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With the HH-139A and the recently delivered HH-101A Caesar, the Italian Air Force has renewed its rotary-wing fleet with modern choppers capable to perform a wide spectrum of missions, from the CSAR (Combat SAR) to the Special Operations support.

Image credit: Alessandro Caglieri

 

First black-colored HH-101A Caesar special ops helicopter presented by the Italian Air Force

The Italian Air Force is about to take the first AgustaWestland HH-101A Caesar on charge.

On Jun. 19, the Italian Air Force presented its first AgustaWestland HH-101A Caesar helicopter (a military variant of the AW.101) to the press at Cervia airbase, home of 1st Brigata Aerea Operazioni Speciali (Special Operation Air Brigade).

Pierpaolo Maglio was there to report about the event for The Aviationist and take the interesting photographs you can find in this post.

As Maglio reports, the first Caesar, coded 15-03 (still carrying the experimental serial number CSX 81866, that will become M.M. 81866 as soon as the airframe is formally assigned to the Italian Air force) flew from the UK to Cervia with a mixed crew of 2 AgustaWestland pilots and 4 Italian Air Force crew members whose training is going to be over in the next few weeks.

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The roomy cargo bay was almost void with just 5 seats installed for the journey.

The Italian Air Force has ordered 12 HH-101As with an option for 3 more examples. The aircraft will be assigned to 21° Gruppo (Squadron), currently flying the AB.212 at Grazzanise airbase. The “Tiger” squadron of the Italian Air Force will be assigned to 15° Stormo and based at Cervia, where new facilities to host the unit are being built.

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Later on, a detachment will also be established at Trapani airbase in Sicily.

According to Maglio, the Commander of 15th Stormo, Col. Massimetti, said that CaeSAR is simply the perfect machine to fill the gap left in the heavy SAR role by the retirement of the old HH-3F on September 2014. Though a good and fast machine, the immediate replacement for the Pelican, the HH-139A, is in a much smaller category: in disaster relief operation the HH-101A offers a significant payload and could save as much as 25 people (or more) in each sortie.

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Along with traditional SAR (Search And Rescue) duties, the HH-101A will also conduct Combat SAR, Personnel Recovery, Slow Mover Interceptor and Special Operation Air Support. For these tasks, it will be equipped with up to 3 guns (two from the sides and one six-barrel mini-gun in the rear ramp swinging down from the ceiling in order not to block the ramp while not in use), advanced self defensive systems and air refueling probe.

Col. Massimetti also praised the new machine for its maneuverability and perfect performance in brown-out and white-out conditions. Noteworthy, the tips of the blades of the main rotor of the new helicopter take advange of BERP design and have downward pointing winglets that help in keeping a clear area under the HH-101A upon landing in dust or snow conditions.

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Pierpaolo Maglio talked to the aircrew of the very first HH-101A who said the CaeSAR is also very silent, much more than smaller helicopters, something that will help a lot in Special Ops missions along with its cool night paint.

Caesar cockpit

Image credit: Pierpaolo Maglio

 

Some stunning pics of the new HH.101 “Caesar” helicopter for the Italian Air Force

The new helicopter is ready for delivery to the Italian Air Force.

The AgustaWestland HH-101A “Caesar” is about to be delivered to the Italian Air Force.

The helicopter, a variant of the AgustaWestland AW101 advanced medium lift helicopter for Personnel Recovery, Special Forces Operations support, SAR, MEDEVAC and Slow Mover Intercept, is going to be assigned to 15° Stormo (Wing) based at Cervia, complementing the HH-139 already in service and fully replacing the recently retired HH-3F Pelican.

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The HH-101A, configured to host a combination of up to five crew members plus 22 fully equipped troops or 6 crew members plus 8 troops for special operations, can carry three M134 7.62 mm pintle mounted Gatling-type machine guns, aerial refueling kit, armoured cockpit seats, ballistic protection for machine gun operators as well as for critical systems and an Integrated Electronic Warfare System providing self-protection against radar, laser and infrared threats.

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Thanks to its three Rolls-Royce Turbomeca RTM322-01 the combat chopper can reach a maximum speed of 167 knots with an operative range of 517 miles.

The Italian Air Force plans to operate 15 such helicopters.

Recently, photographer Richard Cliff had the opportunity to visit Merryfield, a small airfield near Yeovilton Air Station which AgustaWestland and the Royal Navy use for helicopter training on a daily/nightly basis and took the stunning pictures of one of the HH101 destined to the Italian Air Force that you can find in this post.

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Image credit: Richard Cliff

 

Photo shows a tanker surrounded by five thirsty Eurofighter Typhoons jets at night

Aerial refueling operations always provide some cool photo opportunities.

The photographs in this post were taken from an Italian Air Force Boeing KC-767A tanker during aerial refueling operations over central and southern Italy on May 4.

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They show several Eurofighter Typhoon jets belonging to the 4° Stormo (Wing) based at Grosseto, taking gas from a KC-767 tanker of the 14° Stormo from Pratica di Mare.

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The KC-767 is equipped with both the sixth generation flying boom (based on the one of the American KC-10), and three hose and drogue stations to refuel both aircraft equipped with onboard receptacle and those with a refueling probe: the KC-767 uses a futuristic remote boom operator’s station located behind the cockpit where boom operators, operate both the hoses and the flying boom by means of joysticks and live video filmed by cameras mounted on the aircraft’s fuselage.

Typhoon refuel formation

Image credit: Remo Guidi

 

Here’s what it’s like to experience a 280 deg/s instantaneous roll rate in a modern jet trainer

Modern jets feature an impressive instantaneous roll rate

The roll rate, expressed in degrees per second, is the rate at which an aircraft can change its roll attitude. Modern jet fighters can achieve quite high maximum roll rates: the faster they can rotate around longitudinal axis the faster they can transit from one maneuver to another one.

However, the roll rate is just one of the parameters (not all equally important) that influence the aircraft’s maneuvering performance.

Although the roll rate depends on the configuration, weight, speed, altitude and the fact the rate is measured from stable flight (instantaneous roll rate) or after the rotation has been given some time to build up (i.e. the aircraft keeps on rolling long enough), the maximum roll rates for some of the most famous combat planes can be either found on vendors datasheets or online (hence, take them with a grain of salt): according to most reports a Rafale features a maximum roll rate of 270 deg/s, the Eurofighter Typhoon is able of around 250 deg/s, the F/A-18E Super Hornet has a maximum roll rate of 120 deg/s whereas the F-16 can roll at 240 deg/s.

Accurate or not (sometimes such performance data are PR-influenced…), the maximum roll rate may data gives a hint of the ability of the modern aircraft to rotate around the longitudinal axis.

As already reported, a few weeks ago, we had the opportunity to take part in a mission aboard the Alenia Aermacchi M-346 of the Italian Air Force, one of the most advanced jet trainers currently available.

During the flight, the pilot (Maj. Alessandro Olivares, Commander of the 212° Gruppo) showed me the stunning roll performance of the new aircraft (believed to be able of a 280 deg/s roll rate): he performed an aileron roll, an aerobatic maneuver in which an aircraft does a full 360° revolution around its roll axis.

Here below you can see the video of the maneuver.

The aircraft was extremely responsive, immediately achieved a high angular acceleration and rolled so fast, my head almost hit the canopy.

The roll rate of the T-346A (the designation of the Master within the Italian Air Force) may have been 280 deg/s or not; for sure, it was impressive to me, and similar enough to that of the 4th and 5th generation fighter jets to the student pilots of the LIFT (Lead-In to Fighter Training) course on the M-346 destined to fly F-35 or Eurofighter Typhoon multi-role jets.