Tag Archives: Boeing 787 Dreamliner

[Photo] Airbus A350 takes off as Airbus A380 comes to land at Farnborough

A nice head-on combo image of the Airbus A350 and Airbus A380 during Farnborough International Airshow 2014.

Even if the F-35 saga is what most people will remember about this year’s edition, Farnborough International Airshow, in UK, featured several other highlights, including, as always, some stunning air displays by huge commercial planes.

Among them, the demo of Boeing 787-9, the newest and biggest version of the Dreamliner, with some stunning maneuvers performed by the 280-seat passenger planes, and the displays of the A350 and A380.

The Airbus planes flew their displays in sequence:  as the cool image above, taken by Rich Cooper, shows while the Airbus A380 (which was preceded by an A400M Grizzly) was coming to land at the end, the A350 took off to perform its demo flight.

Image credit: RC-Pro Photography

 

Selfie with Dreamliner: F-16 pilot takes self-portrait photo with Boeing 787 on his left wing

Another selfie taken by a Dutch F-16 pilot flying alongside the first Dutch Boeing 787-8.

Here’s an interesting series of selfies, taken by GoPro cameras, showing Arkefly airline’s first 787-8,  the first Dreamliner in the Netherlands, welcomed by the RNlAF (Royal Netherlands Air Force) F-16 Demo Team.

The RNLAF F-16 Demo Team 2014-2015 is made of personnel from both the 323 and 322 Squadrons, based at Leeuwarden Airbase. The team consists of one display pilot, Captain Jeroen “Slick” Dickens, four display coaches, eight technical specialists and a webmaster.

RNlAF Demo with 787 back

As the images shows, the Boeing 787 was intercepted by two Dutch F-16s in standard QRA (Quick Reaction Alert) configuration (that is to say, by armed aircraft) whose pilots wore JHMCS (Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System) instead of the characteristic Demo Helmet you can see in these images.

RNlAF Demo with 787 side

Image credit: RNlAF Demo Team

 

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Video shows what a Boeing 787 Dreamliner can do in the hands of an F-18 Hornet fighter jock

The following video, put under the spotlight by an article by the Daily Mail, shows what a Boeing 787 Dreamliner can do if given to a former Hornet fighter jock (Ex Boeing F-18 display pilot Mike Bryan).

The footage was filmed during an amazing display of July 2012’s Farnborough International Airshow 2012, when The Aviationist witnessed and reported about the impressive maneuverability of the Dreamliner.

Noteworthy, as we reported directly from FIA 2012 back then, some minutes after the last display on Jul. 11, 2012, a Ground Power Unit took fire near the Boeing 787 prompting a quick reaction by the local firefighting vehicles.

B787 take off FIA

It was an omen to what would have happened months later, when a faulty battery grounded fifty B787 belonging to eight airlines.

Boeing has redesigned the battery system that will have to be approved and certified by the FAA, before airlines can fly the Dreamliner again.

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Farnborough 2012 photo: Boeing 787 Dreamliner shows its amazing maneuverability

One of the highlights of Farnborough International Airshow 2012 was the new Boeing 787 Dreamliner in the Qatar Airways colors.

The liner took part to the daily air display (until Jul. 11) with an elegant series of maneuvers (including a touch and go that is quite rare among civilian aircraft) that showed its stunning maneuverability, as done by the Airbus 380.

Furthermore, besides the steep take off, the B787 showed its short landing capabilities.

Some minutes after the last display, a Ground Power Unit took fire near the Boeing 787 prompting a quick reaction by the local firefighting vehicles.

Here are some of the most interesting pictures (including one of the above mentioned touch and go on the left main landing gear) taken by The Aviationist team at FIA 2012.

Exclusive Infographic: all Cyber Attacks on Military Aviation and Aerospace Industry

2011 has been an annus horribilis for information security, and aviation has not been an exception to this rule: not only in 2011 the corporate networks of several aviation and aerospace industries have been targeted by digital storms (not a surprise in the so-called hackmageddon) but, above all, last year will be probably remembered for the unwelcome record of two alleged hacking events targeting drones (“alleged” because in the RQ-170 Sentinel downed in Iran episode, several doubts surround the theory according to which GPS hacking could have been the real cause of the crash landing).

But, if Information Security professionals are quite familiar with the idea that military contractors are primary and preferred targets of the current Cyberwar as the following infographic shows, realizing that malware can be used to target a drone is still considered an isolated episode, and even worse, the idea of a malware targeting the multirole Joint Strike Fighter is still something hard to accept.

However, things are about change dramatically. And quickly.

The reason is simple: the latest military and civil airplanes are literally full of electronics, which play a primary role in managing avionics, onboard systems, flight surfaces, communcation equipment and armament.

For instance an F-22 Raptor owns about 1.7 millions od line of codes , an F-35 Joint Strike Fighter about 5.7 millions and a Boeing 787 Dreamliner about 6.5 millions. Everything with some built in code may be exploited, therefore, with plenty of code and much current and future vulnerabilities, one may not rule out a priori that these systems will be targeted with specific tailored or generic malware for Cyberwar, Cybercrime, or even hacktivism purposes.

Unfortunately it looks like the latter hypothesis is closer to reality since too often these systems are managed by standard Windows operating systems, and as a matter of fact a generic malware has proven to be capable to infect the most important U.S. robots flying in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya, and Indian Ocean: Predator and Reaper Drones.

As a consequence, it should not be surprising, nor it is a coincidence, that McAfee, Sophos and Trend Micro, three leading players for Endpoint Security, consider the embedded systems as one of the main security concerns for 2012.

Making networks more secure (and personnel more educated) to prevent the leak of mission critical documents and costly project plans (as happened in at least a couple of circumstances) will not be aviation and aerospace industry’s information security challenge; the real challenge will be to embrace the security-by-design paradigm and make secure and malware-proof products ab initio.

While you wait to see if an endpoint security solution becomes available for an F-35, scroll down the image below and enjoy the list of aviation and aerospace related cyber attacks occurred since the very first hack targeting the F-35 Lightning II in 2009.

Of course aviation and aerospace industries are not the only targets for hackers and cybercriminals. So, if you want to have an idea of how fragile our data are inside the cyberspace, have a look at the timelines of the main Cyber Attacks in 2011 and 2012 (regularly updated) at hackmageddon.com. And follow @pausparrows on Twitter for the latest updates.

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