Tag Archives: Spanish Air Force

Exercise Anatolian Eagle 2014-2: Turkey, Jordan, Qatar, Spain and the UK train for real combat ops

Attracting an increasing number of foreign air arms, Anatolian Eagle has become a high-tech exercise that gives participating units the opportunity to assess their capabilities and readiness for war, to improve multinational cooperation, and to test new weapons systems: some extremely important tasks, especially for nations such as Turkey which face increasing instability, pressure and threats along their borders.

Held three times a year (with two national classes reserved for the Turkish Air Force units and one open to allied air forces) at Konya airbase, in the Central Anatolia Region of Turkey, Anatolian Eagle (AE) is a medium-scale air exercise inspired by the U.S. Red Flag and Maple Flag series, the aim of which is to train fighter pilots for the first few days of a modern conflict.

F-16 lined up

The first Anatolian Eagle exercise took place in 2001, in the wake of the participation to Deny Flight, Deliberate Force and Allied Force operations in the Balkans, during which the Turkish Air Force gained enough experience to be able to organize realistic war games, similar to those conducted in the airspace around Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, to train its own squadrons as well as NATO and regional partners.

QEAF landing

The scenario, which increases in complexity and lethality through the two-week training, consists of two teams, Blue and Red. Blue forces are mainly tasked with Combined Air Operations (COMAOs) on tactical and strategic targets in Red lands, protected by air and ground assets, including Turkish F-16 aggressor aircraft and Surface to Air Missile (SAM) threats of all types:  SA-6 Gainful, SA-8 Gecko, SA-11A/B Gadfly, ZSU 23-4 Gundish, Skyguard/Sparrow, Hawk and MTS (Multi-Threat Simulator).

NATO E-3A AWACS from the local Forward Operating Base and, for the first time, Turkish Air Force Boeing 737 AEW&C Peace Eagle aircraft, provided Airborne Early Warning support for the Blue team, delivering tactical information about air and ground assets by datalink. All missions, including air-to-air engagements, are monitored in real-time and recorded by Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation (ACMI) sensors.

Anatolian Eagle 2014-2 featured combat aircraft from Jordan (F-16s), Qatar (Mirage 2000s), Spain (EF-18s and Eurofighter Typhoon C.16s) and the UK (Typhoon FGR4s) along with Turkish assets; overall, approximately 80 aircraft of different types took part in the drills.

Phantom take off

Among the Turkish participants there were about 40 F-16 Block 30/40/50 jets; 11 F-4E 2020 Terminator del 111 e 171 Filo, which operated within the “Red” force and flew also with the AGM-142 Popeye; and, as said the new Boeing 737 AEW&C Peace Eagle of the 131 Filo. Qatar Emiri Air Force took part in the exercise with four Mirage 2000-5 from Doha’s 7th Air Superiority squadron whereas Royal Jordanian Air Force deployed three F-16s (including a two seater) from 1 Squadron from As Shaheed Muwaffaq al Salti airbase at Al Azraq.

RJAF F-16

The Spanish contingent was made of six EF-18 Hornet with the Ala 12 from Torrejón and six Eurofighter Typhoon C.16 with Ala 14 from Albacete whereas the Royal Air Force deployed six Typhoon FGR4s and a team consisting 13 pilots from 11 Squadron and 3(F) Squadron from RAF Coningsby.

EF-18

Typhoon take off

Noteworthy, on Jun. 20, during the last day of the exercise, a brand new A400M of the Turkish Air Force (the first of 10) paid visit to Konya for the first operative mission since its delivery.

A400M

 

 

Eurofighter Typhoon air combat maneuvering cockpit footage

The following video brings you aboard a Spanish Air Force Eurofighter Typhoon of the Ala 14 (14th Wing), from Albacete (home of the Tactical Leadership Programme).

Cockpit cameras give a clear idea of what flying in formation above the clouds or at low altitude as well as performing aerobatics and dogfighting with another EF-2000 look like from a pilot’s point of view.

Note how close the aircraft are during an head-on engagement at 01.42.

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More NATO Tactical Leadership Programme action photos

As already explained on a previous post, on Oct. 1 and 2, the Tactical Leadership Programme and Albacete Airbase hosted a Spotters Day during TLP Flying Course 2013/5.

Here are some photographs shot by The Aviationist’s contributor Alessandro Fucito during the event.

Albacete TLP 2013-5 Spotter Day 190

Turkish Air Force F-16D from 151 Filo.

Albacete TLP 2013-5 Spotter Day 161

Ala 14’s Eurofighter Typhoon.

Albacete TLP 2013-5 Spotter Day 146

Swiss Air Force F-18 from FlSt18.

Albacete TLP 2013-5 Spotter Day 121

Eurofighter Typhoon from the Italian Air Force’s 4° Stormo.

Albacete TLP 2013-5 Spotter Day 108

Polish Air Force’s F-16C Block 52+ from BLT31.

Albacete TLP 2013-5 Spotter Day 096

Mirage 2000D from the French Air Force’s EC 03.033.

Albacete TLP 2013-5 Spotter Day 141

Mirage 2000C from EC 02.005.

Albacete TLP 2013-5 Spotter Day 059

An Italian Air Force HH-3F from the 15° Stormo. This kind of helicopter is currently being replaced within the Aeronautica Militare by the Agusta Westland HH-139A.

Top photo: Spanish F/A-18 from Ala 46 (all images by Alessandro Fucito).

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Albacete’s NATO Tactical Leadership Programme Spotters Day

On Oct. 1 and 2, the Tactical Leadership Programme and Albacete Airbase organized a two-day Spotters Day during TLP Flying Course 2013/5.

With nearly 400 spotters attending the event, it has was the largest spotter day organized since the TLP moved from Florennes to Albacete.

Sea King

The FC 2013/5, which was the last course of the year, saw the participation of several assets from Spanish Air Force, Swiss AF, French AF, Polish AF, Turkish AF, Italian AF and the RAF.

Mirage 2000N

As a side note, the Spotters Day was one of the last non operation daily flights of the Spanish Mirage F1 which are in the process of being stored for the sale.

Mirage SpAF

Nicknamed ‘La abuela’ (Grandmother) by the Spanish fighter jocks, the Mirage F1 is being gradually replaced by the Eurofighter Typhoon.

Typhoon landing

Image credit: Alvaro Muñoz-Aycuens

 

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Spanish pilot achieves impressive milestone: 4,000 flying hours on the Northrop Grumman F-5 Freedom Fighter

On Jul. 11, 2013, Lt. Col. Jesus Antonio Caballero, head of the Research Group & Air Forces of the Spanish Air Force (Ejercito del Aire) 23 Wing in Talavera Air Base, completed 4,000 flying hours on the F-5 aircraft . This accreditation, obtained individually, is a unique landmark in the Spanish Air Force and even internationally, as to date, there is no evidence that any other pilot from countries that operate or have operated different versions of F-5, to have reached that milestone.

The historical flight during which Caballero reached 4,000 flying hours consisted of a air-to-air nterception training mission, included in the Plan of Instruction for IPs (instructor pilots) of the 23 Wing.

SpAF F-5 pilot

Lieutenant Colonel Caballero made his first flight in F-5 back in 1987, after being assigned to the 23 Wing as a student. He continued with that fighter in the 21 Wing Air Base in Morón and in the Center of Logistics Armaments and Experimentation (CLAEX) in Torrejon Air Base. From 1993 he returned to the 23 Wing as an IP, having piloted the F-5 A/RF/B & M versions of this veteran aircraft.

The 23 Wing’s main mission is to provide training, both theoretical and flights (Fighter & Attack Phase) to students in the 5th year of the Spanish Air Force Air Academy selected to perform the said phase.

Bought in the sixties, the Spanish Government took the decision to provide to the Spanish Air Force +50 F-5 A & B fighters built under license by CASA.

First units provided fighter missions in Moron and Canary Islands Air Bases. Later, all the F-5 units marched to Talavera to replace veterans T-33.

In recent years the F-5 has undergone a complete modernization, especially its avionics, to suit the teaching Fighter & Attack skills as a step towards next-generation aircrafts such as the F/A-18A+ Hornet and the Eurofighter Typhoon. This new version of the aircraft is called F-5M

All fighter pilots that currently fly in the Spanish Air Force were formed in the F-5M.

El Lince Analista for TheAviationist.com

Picture Credit: Spanish Air Force

 

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