Tag Archives: Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II

[Video] Small plane lands on deck of a cargo ship. A future for low cost naval aviation?

Some small navies around the world (or largest ones with budget problems) may consider this set up: a small, STOL (Short Take Off and Landing) plane and a flat deck merchant ship for future low cost naval aviation?

Just kidding.

Still, the video, recorded with several cameras including some inside the plane and others on a Cessna 172 camera ship, is interesting as it shows the extreme STOL Foxbat A22 landing on a modest 3,500-ton multipurpose vessel 93 meters in length.

The small aircraft was flying just above stall speed, the ship was sailing at 9 knots into the wind and, even if the air speed was enough to keep the Foxbat flying, the speeed relative to the ship was almost zero.

Using a procedure that vaguely reminds that of real STOVL planes (like the F-35B and, above all, the AV-8B Harrier) approaching an amphibious assault ship, the A22 nears the deck in front of bridge 60 metres x 15 meters and then almost falls vertically to touchdown.

H/T to Michael Guthenberg for the heads-up

 

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F-35 makes a step towards operational status with first guided weapon drop test

Even if the bomb used in the test did not contain any explosive, the F-35 test team made a new step towards operational status by conducting the program’s first guided weapon test on Edwards Air Force Base Precision Impact Range Area in California, on Oct. 29.

The Electro-Optical Targeting System, or EOTS, enabled the pilot to identify, track, designate and deliver the GBU-12 on target.

The F-35B, the STOVL (short takeoff and vertical landing variant) of the Joint Strike Fighter, released the weapon from its internal weapons bay from 25,000ft. The bomb fell for 35s before hitting the designated target (a tank).

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RAF pilot performs first UK takeoff of F-35B Lightning at sea

Beginning in 2018, according to the current schedule, the F-35B, the STOVL (Short Take Off Vertical Landing) version of the Lockheed Martin’s Joint Strike Fighter, will operate from Royal Navy’s Queen Elizabeth aircraft carriers.

Whereas pilots and ground crews are working alongside their U.S. Marine Corps counterparts at Eglin Air Force Base, in Florida, a UK pilot, Sqn Ldr Jim Schofield, performed the first UK takeoff of an F-35B at sea on USS Wasp.

As part of the testing campaign aimed at expanding the plane’s flight envelope, the F-35B conducted vertical night landings on USS Wasp off the Florida coast.

Noteworthy, the pilot explains how easy to fly is the STOVL JSF, compared to the legendary Harrier Jump Jet.

 

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NVG video: F-35B Accomplishes First Night Vertical Landing Aboard USS WASP

On Aug. 14, the first DT-II (Developmental Test Phase Two – the second of three planned tests aimed at expanding the F-35B’s shipboard operating envelope for the U.S. Marine Corps) night vertical landing was executed by F-35 Marine Corps test pilot, Lt. Col. C.R. “Jimi” Clift. Clift, a Harrier pilot.

The F-35B is the STOVL (Short Take Off Vertical Landing) of the JSF, destined to replace all the USMC assets, including the Harrier jump jet and the F/A-18 Hornet.

Image credit: U.S. Marine Corps

 

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This is how Japanese see their future air war against China over Senkaku Islands. With new stealth planes

Even if they are promotional material aimed to support a recently released book, the videos in this post are particularly interesting as they show how the Japanese see their future air-sea battle scenario.

Obviously, China is perceived as the main (only?) enemy and the Senkaku Islands (also known as Diaoyu Islands in China) is where Japanese foresee the close encounter with Beijing carrier battle group‘s J-15s.

Noteworthy, whereas Chinese planes featured in the video are current ones (there’s no trace of J-20s or J-31s), Japanese fighter jets are mainly new F-3s (whose development is not to start before 2016-17) namely F-3As and delta-wing F-3Es.

Some footage also features several F-35Cs embarked on a Japanese aircraft carrier.

Although it does not seem to be an official Japan Air Self Defense Force product, the CGI footage seems to support Japan’s current nationalist instinct and fits with the Abe government’s path to rearming.
Nothing more than a cartoon then. At least for the moment.

Written with David Cenciotti

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