Tag Archives: helicopter

China Debuts New Indigenous Attack Helicopter for Export Market in First Flight

New Z-19E Black Whirlwind Flies for First Time in Harbin, China.

Chinese aircraft company AVIC Harbin Aircraft Industry Group debuted its new Z-19E “Black Whirlwind” attack helicopter during its first flight at Harbin Airport in Harbin, Heilongjiang, northeastern China.

The first flight of the Z-19E Black Whirlwind, also referred to as the AH-19E in Chinese media, was a basic lift-off to hover and then several basic low-speed flight maneuvers over the airfield. The aircraft was carrying eight large, white missiles that bear resemblance to the U.S. designed Hellfire guided missile along with what may have been a gun pod and a launch canister for high-velocity aircraft rockets (HVARs) possibly analogous to the U.S. 2.75” folding fin aircraft rocket (FFAR).

The crew arrangement seems to be similar to that of the U.S. AH-64 Apache helicopters where the pilot sits in the rear and the weapons operator sits in the front of the helicopter.

A noteworthy feature of the Z-19E is the “Fenestron” protected, shaft-driven tail rotor assembly. This is different from many attack helicopters such as the U.S. AH-64 Apache, European Tiger and Russian Mi-28 that use conventional, exposed tail rotors mounted outside the fuselage tail boom. The Fenestron enclosed tail rotor reduces lost thrust by ducting the drive forces generated by the rotating blades, reduces audible signature (quieter) and is safer in ground operations.

Fenestron is also noticeably quieter than a conventional external tail rotor improving audible stealth. The most common Fenestron equipped helicopter in use today is the U.S. Coast Guard’s HH-65C Dolphin. Fenestron is also seen on the Russian Kamov Ka-60- and the Kawasaki OH-1 light observation/attack helicopter. Fenestron tail rotors are generally more expensive to manufacture and heavier than a conventional external tail rotor however.

This is China’s first attempt at a locally produced, advanced attack helicopter intended for the export market. Their current primary attack helicopter is the CAIC Z-10 or WZ-10, an indigenously produced attack helicopter of primarily Russian design. It is an older looking helicopter with external tail rotor and cockpit arrangement that resembles the European Tiger attack helicopters. It was originally developed under a secret contract with famous Russian helicopter builder Kamov. The program for the Z-10 began in the early 2000s; an unusually late arrival for China to attack helicopter development compared to the U.S. and Russia who have been building dedicated attack helicopters since the 1960’s.

Depending on cost, capabilities and import/export restrictions the new Chinese Z-19E Black Whirlwind could have interested export clients in African and Middle-eastern/Asian countries where there is no locally built, advanced, fully capable attack helicopter.



Top image credit: Reuters

 

Salva

Incredible footage shows MH-60 Seahawk helicopter attempting to land on the pitching deck of a warship in rough seas

Watch this intense video of a new Danish MH-60R Seahawk landing on the small pitching and rolling helicopter deck of a patrol vessel.

The following video was released by the Danish Air Force on Facebook last week.

It was filmed during a recent test of the new Sikorsky MH-60R Seahawk off the Faroe Islands, between Norway and Iceland.

The multi-mission naval chopper was involved in sea trials with a Danish and an Australian test pilots called to explore the aircraft’s flight envelope and landing restrictions in the very same extreme conditions Danish warships can find operating in the North Atlantic Ocean.

As you can see, landing a (modern) helo on the small, pitching deck of an ocean patrol vessel requires skills, coordination and some bravery.

The Danish Air Force has received three of eight MH-60R Seahawks ordered in 2012, last June.

H/T Lasse Holmstrom for the heads-up

 

Stunning video will bring you aboard a NASWI MH-60S during sea, land and mountain SAR missions

Naval Air Station Whidbey Island (NASWI) Search and Rescue (SAR) as you have never seen it before.

Tasked to be the first responder for the aircraft and personnel stationed at NAS Whidbey Island, Washington, and to support Washington State agencies in case of emergencies, medical evacuations and search and rescue activities, NAS Whidbey Island SAR  is a one of a kind rescue unit, equipped with the MH-60S “Knighthawk” helicopters.

The team, consisting of three helicopters, 10 pilots, 10 rescue aircrewmen and 3 SAR Medical Technicians (SMT’s) is “the premier in Navy Search and Rescue:” personnel of NASWI are highly trained in day and night both overwater and mountain rescue including helicopter rappel and hoist, and mountain landing.

For SAR missions, the unit typically maintains either a 15-minute or a 30-minute alert posture.

This video, provides an insight into what NASWI SAR does, bringing you aboard MH-60S during land, sea and mountain operations.

H/T David J. Ljung for the heads-up

Watch this insanely low-flying Ukrainian Mi-17 helicopter buzz cars on highway

You can’t fly lower than this!

The following video, filmed by a car dash camera, shows a Ukrainian Mi-17 Hip helicopter buzzing the cars on a highway somewhere near Dnipropetrovsk, Ukraine’s fourth largest town, in the central-eastern part of the country.

Ukrainian helicopters, especially Mi-24 Hind gunships supporting the war against pro-Russia separatists, mainly operate at very low altitude where they can be more effective but at the same time they become more vulnerable to anti-aircraft fire: several Hind helicopters and many other Ukrainian aircraft have been shot down by MANPADS (Man Portable Air Defense Systems) in eastern Ukrainian during clashes with Russia-backed militia.

H/T to Foxtrot Alpha for digging up this video

 

Video shows Colombian Army Black Hawk helicopter exploding after landing in a minefield

Warning: Graphic video shows Black Hawk helicopter exploding.

On Jun. 22, a Colombian Army Black Hawk helicopter exploded in a rural area of Teorama municipality.

Out of the 15 soldiers on board the UH-60L chopper, four were killed and six wounded after the Black Hawk landed in a minefield reportedly laid by FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) group.

According to the information released by local media the helicopter belonged to the Army’s 33rd Mobile Brigade.