Category Archives: Aviation Safety

Video shows the moment pilot ejects from Hungarian Gripen jet after belly landing

Interesting footage has emerged of a pilot successfully ejecting from a Hungarian Air Force Gripen jet after crash landing.

On Jun. 10, a Hungarian Air Force JAS-39C single-seater Gripen jet crashed at Kecskemét airbase, in Hungary. The pilot, successfully ejected from the aircraft, was flying a training sortie when he experienced a nose gear failure.

After attempting to re-cycle the undercarriage, Maj. Kadar opted for a belly landing. However, after touching the runway, he lost control of the aircraft and was forced to eject.

A video, shot at the Hungarian airbase shows the mishap unfold: as you can see the ejection seat does not separate from the pilot causing him to fall at higher than expected speed with subsequent injury.

The crash follows another incindet that occurred to a Hungarian Air Force Gripen D on May 19 when a two-seater jet crashed on landing at Čáslav air base in the Czech Republic during exercise Lion Effort. Both pilots successfully ejected from the aircraft.

Although investigation in the crashes is still in progress, in spite of some media reports, Hungary’s fleet of Gripens has not been grounded. According to the Hungarian MoD, the JAS-39C involved in the most recent incident will likely be repaired and returned to active service.

H/T Giuliano Ranieri for the link

 

Did you like the B787 high angle take off? Then watch this U.S. Air Force KC-10 insane departure

This is a really impressive take off!

Last week, the video of a Boeing 787-9 Dreamliner taking off and pull off an amazing aerial display during rehearsals of Paris Air Show 2015 went viral.

The civil liner, that has already proved to be extremely maneuverable, especially in the hands of experienced test pilots, filmed from above seems to go “nearly perpendicular to the ground” immediately after taking off.

Here’s the video.

Cool, even though most of (if not all) the modern liners, equipped with fly-by-wire controls, powerful engines and innovative designs, are much more maneuverable than previous generations aircraft.

Now, take a look at the following footage (if the embed does not work, click here).

It was shot at Seymour Johnson Air Force Base airshow in 1991 and shows a U.S. Air Force KC-10A Extender aerial refueler perform a very high angle take off. Although the tanker was probably empty, it’s still a quite impressive show for such a large (and obsolete) aircraft.

 

Russia has grounded all its Tu-95 strategic bombers after one Bear skidded off runway and caught fire

Moscow has grounded its nuclear-capable bombers after a deadly incident in eastern Russia.

The Russian Ministry of Defense has suspended all the Tu-95 Bear bomber flights after a strategic bomber suffered an incident in Russia’s Far East.

“The Tu-95 ran over the runway during acceleration. There was no ammunition onboard. According to preliminary information, engine fire was the cause behind the accident,” Russia’s MoD said according to a report posted by Interfax news agency.

Five crew members were aboard the Bear bomber that skidded off the runway and caught fire at Ukrainka airfield: one crew member was killed and another seriously injured following the incident.

As a consequence, the Russian MoD has ground the Tu-95 fleet pending investigation: this was the second incident involving a Bear bomber in two years. In 2013, a Bear was damaged after fire started behind the cockpit while the aircraft was taxing down the runway preparing for departure.

The Tu-95 is a +60-year old Russian four-engine turboprop-powered strategic bomber and missile platform. The aircraft is often intercepted by U.S. and NATO planes during routine long-range missions across the world.

 Image credit: Aktug Ates/Wikipedia

 

Here are the photos of the U.S. Air Force F-35A damaged by engine fire last year

 

The U.S. Air Force has released the report and photos of the mishap suffered by an F-35A Lightning II  in June 2014.

A U.S. Air Force Air Education and Training Command (AETC) Investigation Board team has completed the investigation into the mishap occurred to an F-35A assigned to the 58th Fighter Squadron, 33rd Fighter Wing, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida, on Jun. 23, 2014.

According to the report, the F-35A suffered a failure of the third-stage rotor of the engine fan module. The aircraft was taking off for a training mission when the engine caught fire: the pilot safely aborted the takeoff and exited the aircraft.

Although emergency crews responded to the burning aircraft and extinguished the fire, the F-35A was heavily damaged: “Pieces of the failed rotor arm cut through the engine’s fan case, the engine bay, an internal fuel tank, and hydraulic and fuel lines before exiting through the aircraft’s upper fuselage. Damage from the engine failure caused leaking fuel and hydraulic fluid to ignite and burn the rear two thirds of the aircraft. The total mishap damage is estimated to be in excess $50 million.”

The mishap caused a fleetwide grounding that prevented the F-35 to attend Farnborough International Air Show.

F-35 damaged detail

Image credit: U.S. Air Force via Alert5

 

Airbus A400M airlifter crashes shortly after take off from Sevilla in Spain

An Airbus A400M aircraft crashed near Sevilla airport, in Spain, at 12:57 pm local time killing 4 crew members and injuring 2.

On May, 9, the Airbus A400M with the serial number MSN023, departed from Sevilla Airport at 12:45 pm local time for the first production flight crashed to the northwest of the airport.

Four of the six crew members, all Airbus Defence and Space employees of Spanish nationality, died in the incident. According to the last press release, the 2 remaining crew members are currently in hospital in a serious condition.

MSN023 was foreseen to be the third aircraft to be delivered to the Turkish Air Force, whose formal delivery was scheduled for June 2015.

The A400M, using callsign CASA423 was tracked by Flightradar24 via ADS-B: according to the charts posted after the incident, it reached a maximum speed of 173 kts at an altitude of 1,725 feet, then it started descending.

The last log, shows the plane has hit the ground at 167 knots with a vertical speed of about -3,000 feet per minute.

A400M crashed

Image credit: Flightradar24.com