Tag Archives: Joint Strike Missile

An F-16 launched a JSM (long-range strike missile for the F-35) for the first time over Utah last week

Testing of the new missile for the F-35 continues.

Last week, a Joint Strike Missile (JSM) was successfully launched at 22,000 feet from an Edwards Air Force Base F-16 over the Utah Test and Training Center during a missile flight test (which included “challenging maneuvers”) aimed at proving the maturity of the missile and its flight control software.

The JSM is a new missile being developed in partnership with Raytheon for the F-35 by the Norwegian company Kongsberg and the Norwegian Ministry of Defence.

Unveiled on Nov. 29, 2012, the Joint Strike Missile (JSM), is going to be the only powered anti-ship missile that will fit inside the F-35’s weapons bays. Derived from the Naval Strike Missile (NSM), the anti-ship weapon, featuring long-range, low radar cross section and high maneuverability, speed and accuracy, is involved in a flight test program started early 2015 with numerous captive carry tests on an F-16. Testing will continue 2016 and 2017 when qualification program is planned to complete.

The JSM will give the F-35 the ability to fight well-defended targets across long distances. The missile will be integrated on the F-35A (as well as other types of aircraft): even though it would be useful to carry four missiles (2 in the internal bays, 2 on the external pylons) a Lightning II carrying the JSM on the underwing pylons would lose much of its stealthiness, that’s why the Joint Strike Fighter will probably only carry two such stand-off missiles.

Image credit: Lockheed Martin

 

Photo shows F-35A fitted with two externally mounted Joint Strike Missiles

Last week the Norwegian Crown Prince visited Lockheed Martin’s Ft Worth facility as part of an effort to promote Norwegian industry within the JSF-program.

As part of the visit, LM fitted an F-35A with two externally mounted development models of the Joint Strike Missile.

F-35 RNoAF

Image credit: Norwegian MoD

Unveiled on Nov. 29, 2012, the Joint Strike Missile (JSM) developed for the F-35 by the Norwegian company Kongsberg and the Norwegian Ministry of Defence, is the only powered anti-ship missile that can fit inside the F-35’s weapons bays.

Actually, even if carrying the missiles on the underwing pylons would cost the JSF its stealthiness, the F-35 can carry up to six (2 in the internal bays, 4 on the external pylons) JSMs; previously, only 2+2 were believed to be theoretically carried by the 5th generation multirole radar evading plane,

Derived from the Naval Strike Missile (NSM), the anti-ship weapon, featuring long range, low radar cross section and high maneuverability, speed and accuracy, will undergo a Critical Design Review in summer 2013: the CDR will confirm whether the design is mature enough to be able to continue the integration on the F-35.

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First Joint Strike Missile (JSM) multi-role missile fitted to an F-35

Unveiled on Nov. 29, 2012, the first Joint Strike Missile (JSM) developed for the F-35 by the Norwegian company Kongsberg and the Norwegian Ministry of Defence, was fitted to a test Joint Strike Fighter at Lockheed Martin facility at Ft Worth, Texas, on Feb. 27, 2013.

Even if it can be carried on the external wing pylon (as the fit check proved) the new missile, developed in partnership with the Norwegian Ministry of Defence, and in close cooperation with the Norwegian Defence Research Establishment, is the only powered anti-ship missile that will fit inside the F-35’s weapons bays.

In fact, even if it can be useful to carry four such missiles (2 in the internal bays, 2 on the external pylons) an F-35 carrying the JSM on the underwing pylons would lose much of its stealthiness.

Derived from the Naval Strike Missile (NSM), the anti-ship weapon, featuring long range, low radar cross section and high maneuverability, speed and accuracy, will undergo a Critical Design Review in summer 2013: the CDR will confirm whether the design is mature enough to be able to continue the integration on the F-35.

Image credit: Lockheed Martin

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