Tag Archives: Special Operations

Chilling Video of the AK-47 Attack on a Paris restaurant highlights some tips to survive an Active Shooter Scenario

U.S. Navy SEALs and Special Operation Forces have some advice for surviving an active shooter scenario.

On Friday Nov. 13, Paris and its northern suburb Saint-Denis, France, were hit by a series of terrorist attacks which killed 129 and injured 352 people.

The attack consisted of suicide bombs and mass shootings like the one you can see in the following chilling footage.

The video shows a sustained attack on a restaurant in the 11th district by means of AK-47: according to the Daily Mail, that obtained the recordings of three CCTV cameras inside the pizzeria, at least 30 bullets came into the premises, where terrified diners immediately ran for cover behind counters and under tables.

None of them died during the attack, even though, as you can clearly see in the clip a young woman was quite close to it: she was saved by the assault rifle that either misfired or ran out of ammunition.

Anyway, the footage speaks for itself and, if you look for more details, the Daily Mail has a much accurate description of the scene.

Watch the video then continue reading below.

When I saw the clip for the very first time, it immediately thought of an interesting article by Brandon Webb, a former Navy SEAL, published by SOFREP in the aftermath of the Colorado shooting in Aurora, back in July 2012.

Among the tips to survive in case of attack by a gunman Webb shared with the “average citizen” I’ve picked those that probably apply to most scenarios (you can read them all here). As you will see, some of them have probably contributed to save the life of the diners in the Paris restaurant.

Don’t Make Yourself an Easy Target

According to the former Special Operator, at public events, cinemas or even at the restaurant (as in the Paris massacre…) you should always opt for seats that give you good and east vantage points and quick exit points. “It’s the reason I still combat park (back in to a space) and sit with my back to the wall when I’m eating,” Webb pointed out.

Active Shooter Scenario Advice

“Take cover and not concealment.  Concealment hides, cover hides AND protects.  It’s the difference between hiding behind a movie seat or a concrete wall.” Quite obvious, but you may not think to this when bullets are flying above your head. Webb says that it is better to keep the eyes wide open and to act instead of waiting for first responders: they may arrive too late.  Furthermore, “a moving target is extremely hard to hit, even for the well-trained shooter.”

Alter Your Lifestyle, and it May Save Your Life

This is quite obvious. You should avoid large crowds that make rewarding targets for all kind of terrorists. In this case the target was a soft-one, almost randomly selected but, generally speaking, you should take some basic precautions. A few more tips to survive a terrorist attack are included in this more recent story written by former Navy SEAL and JSOC operator Clinton Emerson for SOFREP.

Top image credit: screenshot from the Daily Mail video

 

U.S. Army Special Operations MQ-1C drone has crashed in Iraq. And someone took a selfie with the wreck

A U.S. Gray Eagle UAS has crashed in southern Iraq.

A photo posted on Jul. 21 on Twitter shows some people taking shots around a crashed (still largely intact) MQ-1C Gray Eagle UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) sporting U.S. Army markings.

The Gray Eagle is an advanced derivative of the Predator  specialized in providing direct operation control by Army field commanders. It can fly Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); convoy protection; Improvised Explosive Device (IED) detection as well as providing live aerial imagery to ground patrols carrying also PGMs (Precision Guided Munitions): in other words, it can support a wide variety of missions including attack, assault, reconnaissance, infiltration and exfiltration, and any kind of known or unknown special operations you may imagine.

That’s why it is also operated by the US Army’s 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) “Night Stalkers”, a Special Operations unit that used two stealthy MH-X “Silent Hawk” (or Stealth Black Hawk) to infiltrate and exfiltrate U.S. Navy SEALs during the Osama Bin Laden raid back in 2011.

The “Night Stalker” have been quite active in the region since August 2014 and have recently taken part in a “daring” raid to kill ISIS high level operative Abu Sayyaf,  in eastern Syria.

The 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) is known to operate 12 Gray Eagle (along with a fleet of smaller RQ-11B Raven and RQ-7 Shadow drones, that are used for ISR (Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance) task in support to Special Ops.

 

The Night Stalkers also operate MH-47G Chinooks, MH-60L/K Black Hawks, A/MH-6M Little Birds, MH-X Silent Hawks (and maybe stealthy Little Birds and stealthy Chinooks as well).

Legendary U.S. Army Special Operations Force gets MQ-1C Gray Eagle drones

In May 2011, the 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment (Airborne) used two stealthy MH-X “Silent Hawk” (or Stealth Black Hawk) to infiltrate and exfiltrate U.S. Navy SEALs during the Osama Bin Laden raid.

At that time, nobody knew a radar-evading version of the Black Hawk helicopter existed. However, it was not such a big surprise that such an advanced weapons system was already in the hands of the aircrews of the legendary 160th SOAR, also known as “Night Stalkers”.

The U.S. Army special ops force provides support for both general purpose and special operations forces. They fly MH-47G Chinooks, MH-60L/K Black Hawks, A/MH-6M Little Birds, MH-X Silent Hawks (the latter is an unconfirmed designation) and maybe stealthy Little Birds and stealthy Chinooks as well.

160th SOAR mainly operate at night (hence their name) in attack, assault, reconnaissance, infiltration and exfiltration, and any kind of known or unknown special operations you may imagine.

Since Nov. 19, the Night Stalkers have welcomed the first MQ-1C Gray Eagle.

Gray Eagle is an advanced derivative of the Predator  specialized in providing direct operation control by Army field commanders. It can fly Reconnaissance, Surveillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA); convoy protection; Improvised Explosive Device (IED) detection as well as providing live aerial imagery to ground patrols carrying also PGMs (Precision Guided Munitions).

160th SOAR recently formed E-Company will receive 12 Gray Eagle which will strengthen the U.S. Army Special Operations Aviation Command (ARSOAC) fleet of smaller RQ-11B Raven and RQ-7 Shadow UAS (Unmanned Aerial Systems) giving the Night Stalkers autonomous ISR (Intelligence Surveillance Reconnaissance) and attack capabilities over a larger area of interest.

E-Company

Image credit: U.S. Army

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Airborne Assault (how it looks like if you are not wearing Night Vision Goggles)

Pilots routinely wear Night Vision Goggles that can virtually turn night into day (more or less…).

But even soldiers and Special Operations teams use them (U.S. Navy SEAL Team 6 team wore NVGs during the raid that killed Osama Bin Laden).

Top image shows paratroopers assigned to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, conducting an airborne assault during Field Training Exercise (FTX), at Ft. Bragg, N.C., on Oct. 22, 2013.

The exercise simulates the execution of a large-scale forcible entry into a hostile area; securing sufficient freedom of movement while facing the anti-access and area-denial capabilities of our enemy.

The photograph shows the warfighters parachuting on a field to set up a camp and how it would look like if you were not wearing any Night Vision device.

Image credit: U.S. Air Force

Enhanced by Zemanta

Night air-to-air refueling. From the cockpit of a C-17 cargo plane and through the Night Vision Goggles

Not only B-1, B-2 or B-52 strategic bombers (as well as the various tactical planes) need to refuel at night.

C-17 cargo planes, somehow used to carry Special Operations Forces require proper training to be able to deploy on intercontinental distances and to perform night, global reach missions.

The following video gives a hint of what refueling from a KC-10 Stratotanker aerial refueler looks like from the cockpit of a C-17, at night, through the green vision of the Night Vision Goggles.

 

Enhanced by Zemanta