Tag Archives: Persian Gulf

The Pasdaran have published on Twitter how they would attack a U.S. ship in the Strait of Hormuz

The Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution have used the social network to make public their plan to attack enemy ships in the Strait of Hormuz.

The IRGC (Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps), the branch of Iran’s military whose role is to protect Tehran’s Islamic system, have published on Twitter an interesting drawing showing how they imagine an attack to an enemy warship entering the Persian Gulf.

The plan is use several different weapons systems in a coordinated attack opened by high speed boats, used to create a diversion.

According to Good Morning Iran blog, that translated the text accompanying the rendering, the plan assumes that Iranian high speed boats, equipped with missiles and mines, and disguising themselves as normal fishing boats, would carry out an initial attack against the enemy ship.

While facing the boats, the U.S. warship would be attacked by Iranian submarines, baked by IRIAF (Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force) warplanes, including some F-14 Tomcat jets with indigenous modifications (most probably providing some sort of air superiority in the vicinity), followed by ballistic missiles.

The latter could be the two types showcased during an exhibition held by the IRGC on May 11.

The new home-made ballistic missiles, an upgraded version of the solid-fuel, supersonic Iranian anti-ship missile dubbed Persian Gulf equipped with a 650-kg warhead, are dubbed Hormuz 1 and Hormuz 2.

Both missiles are believed to be more powerful than the Persian Gulf, with the Hormuz 1 being an anti-radar missile with a range of 300 kilometers.

Hormuz

Image credit: Tasnim News Agency

That said, the plan is obviously quite optimistic, as it considers a U.S. warship as an isolated unit, whereas the latter may operate within a large, powerful and very well defended Carried Strike Group, which includes an aircraft carrier, destroyers, supporting vessels and, often, a nuclear submarine, whose task is, among the others, to defend the Group from underwater attacks.

Anyway, the plan and the mock aircraft carrier being built by Iran are a sign Tehran is focusing on developing tactics to defeat the U.S. Navy in the Gulf. Not an easy task though.

Update May 23, 2014, 22.20 GMT:

A reader has found that the image posted by the Pasdaran on Twitter is an infographic posted in the past by the Wall Street Journal. IRGC replaced the English text with Farsi: therefore, even if it’s not their original work, the fact they translated and published it on Twitter means they consider it accurate and most probably coherent with their plan.

 

original

Top image credit: IRGC

 

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[Photo] U.S. F-22 Raptors refuel from KC-135 over the Persian Gulf

U.S. F-22 stealth jets deployed in the Gulf take fuel from a KC-135 Stratotanker.

In order to keep their radar invisibility, U.S. F-22 Raptor multirole jets operating from Al Dhafra, UAE, fly their Combat Air Patrol missions over the Persian Gulf without their underwing tanks.

Refuel close up

That’s why they may need several plugs into aerial refuelers booms to extend their endurance.

Refuel close up 3

F-22s also fly HVAAE (High Value Asset Air Escort) escorting UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) that operate along the boundaries of the Iranian airspace: during one such missions a Raptor discouraged two Iranian F-4s that were trying to intercept a Raptor drone.

Refuel close up 2

Image credit: U.S. Air Force

 

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[Photo] Iranian P-3F maritime patrol plane “buzzes” U.S. carrier’s control tower

New images show how close to the U.S. carriers operating in the Strait of Hormutz, Iranian planes fly.

We have recently published some images showing an F/A-18E Super Hornet escorting an IRIAF (Islamic Republic of Iran Air Force) P-3F flying quite close to USS Abraham Lincoln in the Persian Gulf.

Here you can find some new photographs taken from aboard the U.S. flattop as the P-3F took a close look at the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier (ok, it’s not really buzzing the tower, but it’s not that far away).

P-3F IRIAF

It’s unclear whether the “flyby” was conducted on the same day the Iranian plane was escorted by the Hornet; still, the new images not only prove close encounters in the region occur but they also clearly show the indiscreet Orion in the “exotic” IRIAF color scheme.

P-3F IRIAF back

Image credit: U.S. Navy via Militaryphotos.net (thanks to FdeStV and Kasra Ghanbari for the heads-up)

 

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[Video] F-15E Strike Eagles refuel from KC-135 tanker over the Persian Gulf

A flight of F-15E Strike Eagles of the 366th Fighter Wing deployed from Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho, receive fuel from a KC-135R Stratotanker belonging to the 340th Expeditionary Air Refueling Squadron during a mission over the Persian Gulf, on Aug. 30, 2013.

A unspecified number of Strike Eagles and about 300 personnel from the airbase near Boise, are deployed in Southwest Asia. The aircraft are based at an “undisclosed location”: most probably Djibouti, from where an F-15E contingent has been (covertly) operating for more than 10 years in support of Combined Joint Task Force – Horn of Africa as an Expeditionary Squadron of the 380th Expeditionary Operations Group, based at Al Dhafra, in the United Arab Emirates.

Top image credit: U.S. Air Force

 

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Some interesting details about the F-15E Strike Eagle crashed in UAE (while en route to Afghanistan)

On May 3, 2012, a U.S. Air Force F-15E Strike Eagle aircraft crashed in the United Arab Emirates.

Fortunately, both the pilot and the WSO (Weapon Systems Officer) ejected safely and were later rescued with minor injuries.

Although the first news agencies reported that the combat plane crahsed during a “training mission”, according to our sources, the aircraft belonged to a “section” of Strike Eagles of the 366th FW from Mountain Home Air Force Base, in Idaho, flying as “Cube flight” to Bagram, the airfield that has recently hosted Obama’s Air Force One on a “surprise visit” to Afghanistan.

Indeed, even if the aircraft crashed in UAE, where six U.S. F-22 Raptor fighter aircraft are currently deployed, the 366th FW is not involved in any anti-Iran military build up in the Persian Gulf region: along with the other Strike Eagles, the doomed F-15E was on its way from CONUS to Afghanistan via Moron, Spain (where they landed on May 1) and Al Dhafra air base, UAE.

At Bagram, the 366th FW’s F-15Es will replace the 335FS ones from Seymour Johnson AFB.

About a year ago, an F-15E was also the only U.S. Air Force loss in Libya.

Image credit: U.S. Air Force