Tag Archives: Blue Angels

This Insane 360-degree video will bring you aboard a Blue Angels Hornet during an airshow

Can you believe they can fly that close? Impressive.

The following video was filmed aboard Blue Angel 4,  in the “slot” position,  at the back right hand corner of the Angels’ diamond formation.

It was shot using USA TODAY’s specialized camera, designed to capture video in 360 degree from inside the cockpit of one of the F/A-18 Hornet of the U.S. Navy demo team, during Blue Angels display at the Great Georgia Airshow last month.

360° tech is becoming the new trend in aviation videos.

In August, we published a 360-video from inside the Heritage Flight Museum’s P-51D Mustang while flying and F-22 Raptor in close formation. Previously, we showed a similar video, shot from inside the rear cockpit of an F-5F Tiger of the “Patrouille Suisse” display team during a flight over the Swiss Alps.

Awesome photo shows Blue Angels #5 pulling high gs during demo display

This is one of those pictures that don’t need much words.

Taken on Oct 18, the photo in this post features Lt. Cmdr. Mark Tedrow, Blue Angels #5 and Lead Solo with the U.S. Navy Flight Demonstration Squadron, performing aerial acrobatics during the 2015 Kaneohe Bay Air Show and Open House at Marine Corps Base Hawaii.

What makes this image so unique is the condensation cloud that surrounds the wings of Tedrow’s F/A-18 Hornet: even though spectators usually think that such clouds represent a visual manifestation of a “sonic boom”, actually they are the effect of the quick depression on the flight surfaces that brings the water vapour contained in the air at the condensation temperature.

It is a common phenomenon in high-G maneuvers, like those typically performed by Blue Angels #5, when the depression on the upper side of the wing increases (as the lift does); it can be observed even at sea level, when the amount of moisture is significant and air temperature is quite hot.

Image credit: U.S. Navy


Watch an epic Blue Angels low take off from an awesome point of view

It must have been quite loud.

Pretty cool video showing Blue Angel #7 taking off from Runway 23L at Willow Run Airport for the Thunder Over Michigan airshow.

As usual, the low transition is followed by a high performance climb.

H/T Emiliano Guerra for the heads-up


Blue Angels low flyby over Pensacola Beach sends tents and umbrellas flying

A high speed low flyby causes an unexpected side effect on the shore.

Filmed on the shore at Pensacola Beach, Florida, the following video shows Blue Angels #5 perform a low flyby during the airshow on Jul. 11.

While spectators are distracted by the slow speed pass, another one at very high-speed comes almost unexpected.

The wake turbulence caused by the F/A-18 Hornet of the U.S. Navy display demo team causes tents and umbrellas to fly into the air.

No one was injured by the flying beach umbrellas whilst the crowd seemed to really appreciate the stunt.

Fast low flybys are among the highlights of Blue Angels demo flights at Pensacola.


Hawaii’s F-22 Raptors denied request to perform traditional Pearl Harbor flyover

Even though they have been part of the Pearl Harbor ceremonies since decades, this year’s traditional flyover was not performed because of the restrictions “on all kinds of flyovers across the country”, imposed by the budget cuts.

After sequestration earlier this year grounded 17 active units, including the Air Force Thunderbirds and Navy Blue Angels, Pentagon decided towards the end of October that both demo team would resume their full 34 – 36 seasonal schedule in FY 2014.

However, public appearances will not include flyovers. The U.S. Air Force performed 1,000 flyovers each year but, following the spending review which cut some upgrade programs as well, it will not fly any flyover next year but some high-visibility ones by the Thunderbirds.

However, in spite of restrictions, some flyovers were actually flown in the last few months by Navy aircraft. One of the most spectacular ones was performed by the Blue Angels at the Army-Navy NCAA Game on Dec. 14.

Hence, it seems that the no-flyover policy is mainly an Air Force thing, and this would explain why F-22 Raptors from the 199th Fighter Squadron Hawaii Air National Guard and the 19th Fighter Squadron Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, were denied the Dec. 7 missing man flyover, even if, according to Hawaii News Now, at the same time they were involved in a 70K USD exercise and the flyover could have been performed at little cost.

Noteworthy, last year, an F-22 Raptor, of the Hawaii ANG scraped both horizontal stabilizers on the runway at Joint Base Pearl Harbor landing at its homebase after the missing man flyover.

A 1.8 million USD damage that may have contributed to the decision to deny the permission to perform this year’s Dec. 7 flyover.

Image credit: U.S. Air Force


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