Tag Archives: 82nd Airborne Division

Airborne Assault (how it looks like if you are not wearing Night Vision Goggles)

Pilots routinely wear Night Vision Goggles that can virtually turn night into day (more or less…).

But even soldiers and Special Operations teams use them (U.S. Navy SEAL Team 6 team wore NVGs during the raid that killed Osama Bin Laden).

Top image shows paratroopers assigned to 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, conducting an airborne assault during Field Training Exercise (FTX), at Ft. Bragg, N.C., on Oct. 22, 2013.

The exercise simulates the execution of a large-scale forcible entry into a hostile area; securing sufficient freedom of movement while facing the anti-access and area-denial capabilities of our enemy.

The photograph shows the warfighters parachuting on a field to set up a camp and how it would look like if you were not wearing any Night Vision device.

Image credit: U.S. Air Force

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Awesome, surreal footage: C-17 heavy cargo pallets airdrop through the NVG imagery

The following video shows three heavy cargo pallets being dropped from a C-17 Globemaster in support of ground operations during Joint Operational Access Exercise 13-3.

JOAX is a seven-day integrated exercise between the 82nd Airborne Division and its Air Force partners whose aim is to improve planning and execution of a large-scale forcible entry into a hostile area; securing sufficient freedom of movement while facing anti-access and area-denial capabilities of our enemy.

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These photographs of the Shadow 200 drone being launched and recovered at night by U.S. Army paratroopers in Afghanistan are simply stunning

The following images show the Shadow 200 unmanned aerial vehicle launched and recovered at night at Forward Operating Base Warrior (in the Ghazni province) in Afghanistan by U.S. Army paratroopers with Company B, 1BSTB.

As already explained, the RQ-7 Shadow Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is launched from a trailer-mounted pneumatic catapult, that launches the 400-pound UAV in fewer than 40 feet, and can be recovered with the aid of an arrestor hook similar to that of many combat planes.

Image credit: 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division

Did you know small drones have an arrestor hook? Photos show U.S. Army RQ-7 Shadow 'bot performing arrested landing in Afghanistan.

Made available by the 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, the following pictures not only provide some behind the scenes images of the RQ-7 Shadow operations (at Forward Operating Base Warrior, in the Ghazni province?), in Afghanistan, but clearly show how, just like jets on an aircraft carrier, the small robot can perform arrested landings using a tailhook.

Indeed, the RQ-7 Shadow Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) is launched from a trailer-mounted pneumatic catapult and can be recovered with the aid of an arrestor hook similar to that of many combat planes.

An RQ-7 about to catch the wire

A drone landing at night

A U.S. Army PTSD Aerostat used for anti-IED purposes can be seen in the background.

A safety net is deployed: it can be used to arrest the drone when the arresting wire can’t be used.

Image credit: 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division

The following video, shows a USMC Shadow catching the wires at Camp Leatherneck, in Afghanistan in Oct. 2011.